Monday, November 9, 2009

Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warrior, US Army: Accident occurred November 09, 2009 in Tikrit, Salah ad-Din Province, Northwestern Iraq - Iraq



The men killed were Chief Warrant Officer Mathew C. Heffelfinger, 29, of Kimberly, Idaho; and Chief Warrant Officer Earl R. Scott III, 24, of Jacksonville, Fla.

 


The two soldiers were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

They died Nov. 8 in Tikrit, Iraq, of injuries sustained when their OH-58D "Kiowa" helicopter crashed.

The men were assigned to the 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

Heffelfinger joined the Army in April 2000 and came to Schofield Barracks in December 2007.

He served as an OH-58D pilot, and his military awards and decorations include: Army Commendation Medal, Air Medal – 2nd Award, National Defense Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal with two Campaign Stars, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with one Campaign Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Combat Action Badge, Army Aviator Badge and Parachutist Badge.

Chief Warrant Officer Earl R. Scott III, 24, of Jacksonville, Fla. Scott joined the Army in March 2006 and came to Schofield Barracks in May 2008. He served as an OH-58D pilot, and his military awards and decorations include: Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal with one Campaign Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon and Army Aviator Badge.

Officials say the circumstances surrounding the crash are under investigation.
 SOURCE

(RTTNews) - Two pilots of the US Army were killed in a helicopter crash in Iraq Sunday.

The helicopter in which the Army pilots have been traveling "experienced a hard landing" in northern Iraq's Salah al-Din province, the US military said in a statement released Monday.

It did not disclose the identity of the pilots, pending notification of their families. An investigation has been ordered, it added.

Iraqi police could not confirm the cause of the accident, which occurred at an American base.

With this, the number of US soldiers killed in Iraq since the US forces launched military operations in that country in 2003 rose to 4,361.

Despite a fall in violence in Iraq since last year, a number of recent blasts have raised fears that sustained violence could return to the country, especially after the US troop withdrawal from Iraqi cities and major towns in June.

Pentagon also plans to end combat operations across Iraq by September next year, leaving the challenging task of maintaining the country's security to Iraqi forces.

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