Friday, December 25, 2015

Cessna 525B CitationJet CJ3, N300ET: Incident occurred April 26, 2014 in Port Orange, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA14IA237 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Incident occurred Saturday, April 26, 2014 in Port Orange, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 525, registration: N300ET
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

The pilot reported that he performed a visual approach to land on the 4,000-ft-long, asphalt runway in the turbine-powered multiengine airplane. He added that the landing was “a little long” and that he then realized that he was not going to be able to stop the airplane on the remaining runway. One of the passengers, who was type-rated in the airplane, reported that the airplane remained airborne as it flew past “the numbers” and that it touched down about one-third of the way down the runway. The airplane subsequently rolled off the runway end through grass and then came to rest in a freshwater pond. The airplane sustained minor damage to the landing gear, wings, and flaps. The pilot reported that that there were no mechanical malfunctions with the airplane. He further reported that the incident could have been prevented if he had made a longer final approach, was more familiar with the airport, and had rejected the landing attempt at a safe stage of the approach.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain a proper touchdown point during landing and his failure to go around when he recognized that he would not be able to stop the airplane on the runway, which resulted in a runway excursion.


On April 26, 2014, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 525B (Citation CJ3), N300ET, operated by a private individual, sustained minor damage during a runway excursion, while landing at the Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida. The airline transport pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Opa-Locka Executive Airport (OPF), Miami, Florida, about 1040. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was owned by the pilot through a limited-liability-company.

The pilot reported that he performed a visual approach to runway 23, a 4,000-foot-long, 176-foot-wide, asphalt runway. He further reported that he landed "a little long" and then realized that he was not going to be able to stop the airplane on the remaining runway. The pilot considered performing a go-around; however, he believed that a go-around would have posed a greater hazard at that point in the landing. The airplane subsequently rolled off the end of the runway, through grass, and came to rest in a freshwater pond, about 600 feet from the end of the runway.

One of the passengers, who was seated in the copilot's seat, was a private pilot who held a type rating for Cessna 525s with second-in-command privileges. He reported that the airplane remained airborne as it flew past "the numbers," and touched down about one-third down the runway.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector, after recovery from the pond revealed minor damage to the landing gear, wings, and flaps.

The airplane was equipped with a Fairchild FA2100 series cockpit voice recorder (CVR), which was forwarded to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division, Washington, DC, for readout. The CVR recorded the last 2 hours of airplane operation. A summary report of the recording revealed:

About 1055, while en route to 7FL6, the pilot and front seated passenger discussed landing performance as they utilized the flight management system. The discussion noted runway 23 was expected and concluded that 3,000 feet was required for landing.

At 1126:40, the pilot reported the airplane was about 3 miles from 7FL6.

At 1128:13, the pilot reported that airplane was at 2,000 feet on an extended left downwind for runway 23.

At 1129:17, the front seated passenger reported that the airplane was on final approach for runway 23 over the airport common traffic advisor frequency, which was followed by an automatic "500 feet" call-out, 6 seconds later.

At 1129:55, the passenger said "better get it down," which was followed by sounds consistent with touchdown about 4 seconds later.

At 1130:01, an unidentified voiced stated, "get on the brakes."

At 1130:12, the sound of deep rumbling, similar to the airplane exiting a paved surface was recorded, which was followed by sounds consistent with airplane movement ceasing, about 6 seconds later. [Additional information can be found in the Cockpit Voice Recorder Factual Report located in the public docket.]

The pilot reported that he did not experience any mechanical malfunctions with the airplane. He further reported that the incident could have been prevented if he had made a longer final approach, was more familiar with the airport, and if he would have rejected the landing attempt at a safe stage of the approach.

The pilot reported about 2,900 hours of total flight experience, which included about 900 hours accumulated in the same make and model as the accident airplane, and about 70 and 20 hours flown in the accident airplane, during the 90 and 30 days that preceded the accident.

A weather observation taken at the airport at 1155 included winds from 030 degrees at 4 knots.

http://registry.faa.gov/N300ET

NTSB Identification: ERA14IA237

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Incident occurred Saturday, April 26, 2014 in Port Orange, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 525B, registration: N300ET
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On April 26, 2014, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 525B (Citation CJ3), N300ET, operated by a private individual, sustained minor damage during a runway overrun, while landing at the Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida. The airline transport pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Opa-Locka Executive Airport (OPF), Miami, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was owned by the pilot through a limited-liability-company.

According to an FAA inspector, the pilot performed a visual approach to runway 23, a 4,000-foot-long, 176-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The pilot reported that he landed "long" and then realized that he was not going to be able to stop on the remaining runway. He considered performing a go-around; however, he believed that a go-around would have posed a greater hazard at that point in the landing. The airplane subsequently rolled off the end of the runway, through grass, and came to rest in a freshwater pond, about 600 feet from the end of the runway.

One of the passengers, who was also a private pilot, reported that the airplane remained airborne as it flew past "the numbers," and touched down about one-third down the runway.

Initial examination of the airplane revealed minor damage to the landing gear, wings, and flaps. The airplane was equipped with a Fairchild FA2100 series cockpit voice recorder, which was forwarded to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division, Washington, DC.

A weather observation taken at the airport at 1155 included winds from 030 degrees at 4 knots.
















  
AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY INTO A POND, SPRUCE CREEK AIRPORT, DAYTONA BEACH, FL

PORT ORANGE --  No one was injured after a Cessna 525B CitationJet CJ3 overshot a Volusia County runway and ended up in a pond on Saturday, officials said.

Volusia County Sheriff's Office deputies responded to Spruce Creek Fly-in, a residential airpark located in Port Orange, around 11:31 a.m.

The plane ran off the runway and ended up in a retention pond. There were three people on board, and all three got out safely, according to Gary Davidson, public information officer for the Volusia County Sheriff's Office.

The plane is worth about $3 million, Davidson said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the incident.


PORT ORANGE, Fla. —    A jet rolled into a pond in the Spruce Creek Fly-In community near Port Orange around 11:30 a.m. Saturday, according to deputies.

They said the three passengers on board were able to get out safely.

The Cessna 525B apparently ran off the runway and ended up in a nearby pond, officials said.

Officials floated the plane with airbags and let it drain on the bank.


http://www.wftv.com


No one was injured when a plane overshot the runway at the Spruce Creek Fly-In and wound up in a retention pond late Saturday morning, officials said. 
 
Emergency crews received the call about 11:30 a.m. when the 2005 Cessna Citation, with room for approximately eight passengers, ended up in the water near Port Orange, Mike Inglett, a battalion commander with Volusia County Fire Services, said.

Inglett said there were three people on board and none were injured.

A hazmat team was called to clean up a minor fuel leak, and the plane was removed from the pond about 2:30 p.m., Inglett said.


http://www.news-journalonline.com

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