Thursday, January 7, 2016

Eros 1600, N508AH: Fatal accident occurred January 07, 2016 near Lebanon Municipal Airport (M54), Wilson County, Tennessee

http://registry.faa.gov/N508AH

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA084
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 07, 2016 in Lebanon, TN
Aircraft: EROS 1600, registration: N508AH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 7, 2016, about 1530 central standard time, an experimental amateur-built Eros 1600, N508AH, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain following a total loss of engine power near Lebanon, Tennessee. The private pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Lebanon Municipal Airport (M54). The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to witnesses, the airplane completed two circuits in the traffic pattern of runway 04 at M54, and during the subsequent takeoff, it experienced a total loss of engine power. The airplane made a right turn about 100 feet above ground level, it then banked "sharply" to the left, and "went straight down."

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate for airplane single engine land. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on August 24, 2006, with no limitations. The pilot's logbooks were located and indicated that he had approximately 259 total hours of flight time, of which, 8.9 hours were in the accident airplane. His most recent flight review was signed-off on May 27, 2014. In addition, the pilot held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate that was issued on May 15, 2014.

According to FAA records, the experimental amateur-built airplane was owned by the pilot and issued an airworthiness certificate on May 15, 2014. It was equipped with a two-cylinder Rotax 532 engine, which was installed on October 7, 2015. According to maintenance logs, the airplane had a total time of about 14 hours. In addition, a condition inspection was performed on the airplane by the pilot/owner on October 7, 2015, at a total time of 1.6 hours.

The airplane impacted terrain and came to rest inverted, on a westerly heading, in the immediate vicinity of a residence that was located about 850 feet from the departure end of runway 04. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the wreckage. Flight control continuity was established from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces.

The propeller was rotated by hand and engine continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the back of the engine. In addition, thumb compression was obtained on the back cylinder, however, no compression was observed on the front cylinder.

The top section of the engine case was removed to facilitate further examination and a hole was found in the front cylinder piston. The hole was approximately one centimeter in diameter located in the center of the piston. The back cylinder exhibited carbon deposits and oil residue on the top of the cylinder. The connecting rod bearings were loose in both the front and back cylinders.

Both carburetors were impact separated but remained attached to the engine through cables. Disassembly of both carburetors revealed that the respective jet needle was on the third clip from the top and was under the white retaining cup, and both the main jet and the pilot jet were free of debris. The back and front carburetor boots contained cracks and evidence consistent with material degradation.

A Garmin Aera 500 global position system receiver was recovered from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Recorders laboratory for data download.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Nashville FSDO-19

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



Mark Leon Harrell, age 56, of Lebanon, died January 7, 2016. Harrell was a member of Gladeville Baptist Church where he served as a Deacon and was a member of the GBC Praise Band. He was a self-employed general contractor.

Mark had a passion for flying from an early age and was an avid trumpet player who played with the Jazz Alliance. He was preceded in death by his father, Joseph Harrell.

He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Lisa B. Harrell; mother Louise Harrell; sons Mason (Rachel) Harrell, Trent G. (Rachel) Harrell and Cameron Harrell and his fiance' Brooke Fillmore; brothers Ron Harrell and Joe Harrell; sisters Jennifer Smith and Elizabeth Chadwick and granddaughter Emmalyn Harrell, as well as several nieces, nephews and numerous other extended family.

A Celebration of Life will be conducted 3 p.m. Sunday, January 10, 2016, at Gladeville Baptist Church, 9000 Stewarts Ferry Pike, Mt. Juliet, TN with Rev. Mark Mitchell officiating. Per Mark's wishes, the family requests casual attire.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Gladeville Baptist Church, 9000 Stewarts Ferry Pike, Mt. Juliet, TN 37122.

Visitation will be 5-7 p.m. Saturday at the church.

Bond Memorial Chapel in Mt. Juliet is in charge of arrangements.





LEBANON, Tenn. (WKRN) – A pilot died after his plane crashed in the backyard of a Lebanon home Thursday afternoon around 3:45 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it happened “after departure under unknown circumstances from the Lebanon Municipal Airport,” which is just blocks away from where the plane crashed on Kent Drive.

Nearby homeowner Russell Price told News 2 he could hear the plane as it took off, saying, “I heard the engine die, which is sometimes normal.

“Sometimes they start back up, but I didn’t hear this one start back up. The next thing I heard was a crash,” Price added.

The pilot, 50-year-old Mark Harrell of Lebanon, was being given CPR by emergency personnel when News 2 arrived but was soon transported by ambulance to a nearby hospital.

Police told News 2 he was pronounced dead soon after.

No one else was on the plane, which the FAA said was an Eros 1600, an experimental aircraft.

The home sustained minimum damage, as Harrell landed merely a foot away, and no other injuries were reported.

“The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will determine the probable cause of the accident,” the FAA also said in a statement.

Further details weren’t immediately released.

Buddy Burris, a friend of Harrell, told News 2 he was an excellent pilot who was abundantly cautious.

“There was a little bit of a miss in the engine, so we were working on it today, working on the ignition. It was running fine,” Burris said.

He co-owned a plane with Harrell and the two friends often spent time in their shared airplane hangar.

“Summer afternoons, we’d sit out here and we’d get to look at is field and runway and that’d make us happy,” Burris said.

He told News 2 Harrell leaves behind a wife, three grown sons and some grandchildren.

“Mark was a Christian; he was an honest man,” said Burris through tears. “A true friend.”

Burris also said Harrell had spent seven years building the Eros 1600 and had about 10 hours in flights on it.

Story and video:  http://wkrn.com


LEBANON, Tenn. (WKRN) – A pilot died after his plane crashed in the backyard of a Lebanon home Thursday afternoon around 3:45 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it happened “after departure under unknown circumstances from the Lebanon Municipal Airport,” which is just blocks away from where the plane crashed on Kent Drive.

The pilot, Mark Harrell, was being given CPR by emergency personnel when News 2 arrived but was soon transported by ambulance to a nearby hospital.

Police told News 2 he was pronounced dead soon after.

No one else was on the plane, which the FAA said was an Eros 1600, an experimental aircraft.

Witnesses told News 2 they could hear something was wrong with the plane before it crashed.

The home sustained minimum damage and no other injuries were reported.

“The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will determine the probable cause of the accident,” the FAA also said in a statement.
Source:  http://wkrn.com





The pilot of "an experimental aircraft" has died after the small-engine plane crashed near Lebanon Municipal Airport on Kent Road at 3:40 p.m. Thursday.

Lebanon Public Safety spokesman Mike Justice said the plane landed in the backyard of a house on Kent Road, two blocks from the Lebanon airport.

Police said pilot Mark L. Harrell, 50, of Lebanon, was transported to University Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

Police say there is no damage to the residence, and there are no other injuries.

Witnesses heard what they said sounded like engine trouble before the plane crashed.

Russell Price was outside working at his mother's home across the street when the crash occurred.

“This plane made two passes, which is not uncommon. The airport is right here, so these planes fly low a lot. But that second pass, he was really low. I mean I could hear the exhaust hitting each piston, that’s how close he was," Price said. "I looked up, and he was at about my 12 o’clock; and when he was right above me and I looked up, the engine stalled. Sometimes they do that and they cut back on. His didn’t come back on. Then I heard a loud boom, like a car crash."

Lucas Tramel was inside the home next door when the aircraft crashed.

"I kept going around the corner of the house, and I realized the plane was in our neighbor's yard," Tramel said.

Price and Tramel both were part of a group, including emergency personnel, that lifted the plane off the pilot. Several neighbors said the victim was unresponsive.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Arlene Salac said an Eros 1600 experimental aircraft crashed after departure from the Lebanon Municipal Airport. The cause of the crash is unknown, she said. The FAA will continue to investigate the crash, and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident.

Source: http://www.tennessean.com





LEBANON, Tenn. - The pilot of a single-engine plane involved in a crash in Wilson County has died.

Officials with the Lebanon Police Department said the crash happened near Kent Drive and the Lebanon Municipal Airport.


Police taped off a residential area at the corner of Kent Drive where the plane landed in the backyard of a home.


One man was inside the plane at the time. Officials said he was flying a one-seater experimental plane.


First responders spent time trying to help the man and conducting CPR. He suffered serious injuries and was taken to University Medical Center. His condition was not known.


His identity was not given, but authorities said he was in his 50's.


"It landed in the backyard of the house," said P.J. Hardy, of the Lebanon Police Department. "There's not a lot of damage. From some of the eye witness statements, it came pretty much straight down, so there wasn't much residual damage to the surrounding property."


According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was registered to a Lebanon resident.


Neighbors and witnesses in the area said they heard loud noises coming from the plane before it went down.


Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.newschannel5.com














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