Saturday, January 30, 2016

Lancair IV-P, Art Sign Company, N401PT: Fatal accident occurred January 30, 2016 at Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (KABY), Albany, Dougherty County, Georgia

Art Sign Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N401PT  

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 30, 2016 in Albany, GA
Aircraft: BROOK AARON D LANCAIR IV P, registration: N401PT
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 30, 2016, at 1445 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Lancair IV-P, N401PT, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport (ABY), in Albany, Georgia. The commercial pilot, pilot rated passenger and one additional passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Witness reports indicated that the airplane taxied to the beginning of runway 22 at ABY, and lifted off within the first 1,000 feet of the 6,601 foot-long runway. The airplane began to bank sharply immediately after takeoff, and reached a 90-degree bank as it climbed to treetop height. The witness was not certain if the bank was to the right or left; however, the airplane then began to pitch downward and descend, while maintaining the 90 degree bank until it struck the ground.

A witness located about a quarter mile north of the accident site reported that the airplane sounded "normal" until shortly before impact, when the engine noise became louder.

The airplane impacted a grass field about 1,900 feet down the runway, and 280 feet to the right of the runway centerline. The wreckage path extended from the initial impact ground scar along a heading of 270 degrees, and was 170 feet long. A position light with green lens fragments and the right winglet were among the debris found closest to the initial impact scar. Both wings were separated from the fuselage at their root, and were fragmented along the wreckage path. The left wing tip and winglet were found about 130 feet along the wreckage path. The main wreckage area included the empennage, which was largely intact, with severe fire and impact damage forward of the rear seats. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fractured about mid-span with the outboard portion displaced forward. The elevator trim tab was found slightly trailing edge down. The rudder trim tab was found slightly trailing edge right. The engine mounting structural tubes were fractured and the engine was found inverted. The propeller hub separated from the engine flange, and one of the three blades separated from the hub. All three blades exhibited some bending in the aft direction from about mid-span outward, and each had showed some amount of twisting deformation.

The engine power turbine blades were intact and exhibited slight bending at their tips and rub marks at their roots. The engine casing was displaced and twisted, and the engine could not be turned by hand at the starter or the propeller shafts. After removal of the planetary gear system, the propeller shaft turned easily and did not exhibit any evidence of twisting.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the main landing gear were retracted, however the position of the nose landing gear could not be determined. The position of the flaps could not be determined. Pitch control continuity was confirmed from the elevator though push-pull tubes to the aft cabin area. The elevator moved freely. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder through a push-pull tube to the cable and bell crank assembly in the empennage. The rudder was free to move, however both cables exhibited binding as a result of fire damage. Both ailerons had separated from their respective wings and were found fractured and fire damaged. Both cockpit control sticks remained connected to their control tubes, however continuity from those tubes to the remainder of the control components could not be confirmed due to impact and fire damage.

A portable global positioning system receiver was recovered from the accident site and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder laboratory for examination.

A witness reported that as the occupants embarked, the pilot/owner was seated in the left front seat, and the pilot rated passenger was seated in the right front seat. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot reported 1,000 hours of flight experience at the time of his most recent third-class medical examination which was performed on January 20, 2015.The pilot rated passenger held airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates, and he reported 6,750 flight hours of experience at the time of his most recent FAA second-class medical examination, which was performed on July 8, 2015.

According to FAA records, the airplane was equipped with a Walter 601 series turboprop engine and issued an experimental airworthiness certificate in April 2002. It was purchased by the pilot on December 10, 2015. Initial review of maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent condition inspections of the airframe and engine occurred on October 29, 2015, and both were found to be in satisfactory condition.

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

  
The National Transportation Safety Board officials are asking witnesses of the crash to call them with any information at (844)373-9922. 




ALBANY, GA (WALB) -  Family friends and law enforcement officials across south Georgia remember the retired state trooper pilot who was killed in a plane crash on Saturday.

Friends say Kevin Coalson never met a stranger.  He left a lasting impact on the community.

A final salute to a dedicated retired Georgia State Trooper, as this long procession of patrol cars passed slowly and solemnly through Albany.

"Whenever you saw him, he always had a smile on his face. He was just someone who would just bring joy to a room whenever he walked in," said GSP Sgt. Shawn Urquhart. "I've been crying ever since Saturday.  It's just, it's hard. I don't even know how to describe it."

Hundreds gathered at the Mount Zion Baptist church to remember 48-year-old Kevin Coalson.

Coalson, who flew helicopters with the state patrol, along with 40-year-old Britt Knight, and 30-year-old Brittany Kerfoot were killed after their plane crashed shortly after taking off from Southwest Georgia Regional Airport.

"He was a great pilot and everything.  So, even though it was a tragic death, he died doing something that he loved," said Urquhart.

Four Georgia State Patrol helicopters flew over family and friends following the funeral service.

Close friend Sergeant Shawn Urquhart says Coalson's ability to touch others in the community beyond law enforcement makes her feel proud to be a trooper.

"All the good memories will outweigh that one tragedy, yes."

A memorial service for Brittany Kerfoot was held yesterday Britt Knight's memorial service will happen tomorrow morning at 11:00 at Gillionville Baptist Church.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.walb.com








ALBANY — Dougherty County Coroner Michael Fowler said Tuesday that all three victims of a fatal airplane accident at the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport over the weekend died instantly from blunt force trauma.

Fowler attended the autopsies of Britt Knight, Michael Coalson and Brittany Kerfoot that were conducted Monday at the Georgia Bureau of Investigation lab in Macon.

“The plane caught fire when it hit the ground, but there was no smoke in the victims’ lungs, indicating they were killed on impact,” Fowler said. “The victims were not ejected from the plane, but the impact tore away part of the plane and all three were partially out of the aircraft.”

The accident happened Saturday afternoon as the Lancair IV-P crashed shortly after takeoff.

The crash is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.albanyherald.com

Kevin Coalson, one of three people who died in an airplane crash at Southwest Regional Airport Saturday, is shown in an undated image. 
(Photo courtesy of Dr. Charles Gillespie)



Britt Knight (left) and Kevin Coalson (center)


Doug Brazy, an air safety investigator with the NTSB, said on Sunday that his agency and the FAA have begun what will be a lengthy investigation into the cause of the plane crash Saturday which killed three people. 


ALBANY — Doug Brazy, a safety inspector for the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), during a news conference Sunday afternoon at Southwest Georgia Regional Airport, outlined initial steps being taken by the agency after three people died in a plane crash Saturday.

The three people who died in the crash are listed by the Albany Police Department as David Britt Knight, 40; Brittany Kerfoot, 30, and Kevin Coalson, 49. Coalson is a former trooper with the Georgia State Patrol where he served as a helicopter pilot. Kerfoot was a teacher at Lake Park Elementary School and Knight was a local businessman.

Brazy said he and investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are working to determine a probable cause for the accident, although the length of time to arrive at a conclusion is typically around 12 months.

Various factors will ultimately be examined and documented, Brazy said, including the aircraft itself, the engine systems, marks on the ground, weather, the flight crew and their experience level.

According to Brazy, the crashed airplane, a 2002 Lancair IV equipped with four seats and a single turbo prop engine, will be removed from the airport runway Monday and transported to a site in Griffin for further examination. The Lancair IV is typically built from a kit, Brazy said, and is certified as experimental by the FAA.

“We know the airplane departed about 2 p.m. on Runway 22 yesterday (Saturday) for a local flight. I’m told that airport video shows that it reached “treetop level before it began to descend.”

Brazy said investigators are initially focusing on “perishable” evidence, or evidence which is vulnerable to change by wind, rain or landscaping. In addition, a map of the crash site is being constructed to show where parts of the airplane were found following the accident.

Anyone who saw or heard the airplane on the the day of the accident or know of anyone who did is asked to call NTSB at 1-844-373-9922 or write to EYEWITNESS at NTSB.gov.

“Witness accounts are perishable because now is time people remember and also when they’re more willing to help,” Brazy said.


Source: http://www.albanyherald.com



ALBANY, GA (WALB) -  


The victims of the fatal plane crash on Saturday have now been identified. Albany first responders reported to the aircraft crash on the 3900 block of Newton Road.


49-year-old Kevin Coalson, 40-year-old Britt Knight, and 30-year-old Brittany Kerfoot were all on board. Coalson was a retired state trooper, who flew helicopters with the state patrol. Knight was a father of two young children. Kerfoot was a second grade teacher at Lake Park Elementary in Albany. All of them died in the crash.


The aircraft was on fire after it made impact with the ground. It had crashed shortly after taking off at about 2:45 p.m.


EMS, firefighters, and police all responded to the scene. Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board officials also responded.


The Southwest Georgia Regional Airport was closed until 7 a.m. Sunday morning, with the crash site blocked off by the FAA and NTSB.


All thoughts and prayers go out to the victims' families after this tragic incident.


Story, video, photo gallery and comments: http://www.walb.com




ALBANY, GA (WALB) - A mechanical engineer with the National Transportation Safety Board released new details as they continue their investigation into what caused the fatal plane crash Saturday. After a recent investigation, it is known that the plane departed for a local flight and reached the height of the trees before it began to descend.


Officials say they are only in the very early stages of this investigation, and there is a lot of work ahead of them.


Earlier Sunday, officials confirmed the names of the three people killed in the crash. 40-year-old Britt Knight, 30-year-old Brittany Kerfoot, and 49-year-old Kevin Coalson passed away after the Lancair IV-P experimental aircraft crashed shortly after taking off.


The NTSB says they will not know what caused the crash, and the investigation could take months. They are currently looking for perishable evidence such as marks on the runway, and looking at weather conditions. 


NTSB mechanical engineer Doug Brazy says they're also asking for help from witnesses.


"We'd be very interested in any witnesses that may have viewed the airplane at any time or heard the airplane yesterday at any time to assist us with our accident investigation," said Brazy.


Over the next few days, NTSB officials will be documenting evidence around the area. Typical accident investigations take up to 12 months. The plane will be transported to Atlanta Air salvage in Griffin on Monday for further investigation.


The NTSB asks that witnesses report what they saw by contacting them here.


Story and photo gallery: http://www.wtoc.com



Albany, GA — National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) officials are still investigating the cause of the crash of Lancair IV at Southwest Georgia Regional Airport on Saturday.

Douglas Brazy, Mechanical Engineer with NTSB, said they are working to gather facts and circumstances to determine the cause. Investigators are focusing on gathering information at the site and documenting evidence that may be perishable.


Officials are investigating the airplane engine runway, flight crew experience and training and plane itself.


NTSB investigations usually last for 12 months.


Brazy said the Lancair IV, the aircraft involved in the crash, took off from Runway 22 for a local flight. The plane reached the height of "the top of a tree" before the crash.


NTSB classified this plane as an experimental plane, built by experimental builder, which they say is common.


The plane will be moved on Monday to Atlanta Air Salvage in Griffin, Georgia.


Story and photo:  http://wfxl.com







Officials confirm that three people died as a result of the plane crash.

Police say the plane took off at 2:45 p.m and crashed at 2:46 p.m.

No additional information about the fatalities has been released.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and will take over the investigation. 

For now, officials have closed the airport and there will be no travel in or out.

The original story can be found below.

Albany fire officials, police and emergency medical officials are at Southwest Georgia Regional Airport containing an aircraft accident.

The initial dispatch call stated that an aircraft crashed into a ditch and caught fire.

Story, video and photo: http://wfxl.com







ALBANY --   All three passengers of an airplane that departed from Southwest Georgia Regional Airport at 2:45 p.m. Saturday died when the plane crashed seconds after takeoff, according to Albany first responders.

Phyllis Banks, spokeswoman for the Albany Police Department, said the crash occurred near the north portion of the main runway at 2:46 pm., just one minute after its posted takeoff.

“We have confirmed three fatalities,” Banks said. “We had immediate response (from local emergency agencies).” We’re now waiting on the Federal Aviation Administration. They have been notified and will take over the investigation.”

Officials did not disclose the name of the three people killed in the accident. Some family members were on the scene shortly after the crash.

David Hamilton, City of Albany transportation director, said a counselor was talking with family members.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this time.” Hamilton said.

Albany Fire Chief Ron Rowe said he expects a lengthy investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board. Rowe was unable to report on the type of aircraft involved or the destination of the airplane.

Source:  http://www.albanyherald.com





Investigators have identified the three people killed in a plane crash at SWGA Regional Airport Saturday. David Brett Knight, 40. Brittany Kerfoot, 30 and Kevin Coalson, 49 all died when their Lancair 4 aircraft crashed during take off.


Representatives from the FAA and the NTSB have arrived at the SWGA Regional Airport and are now in charge of the crash site investigation. They will be assisted by David Hamilton, Transportation Director and Chief Bernard Ford, Chief of Airport Safety, Dougherty County Coroner, Michael Fowler and other agencies as needed.

ALBANY, Ga. (AP) -- Authorities say three people are dead after a small plane crashed on takeoff from the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport in the city of Albany.

Albany Police spokeswoman Phyllis Banks told the Albany Herald that the crash occurred near the main runway Saturday afternoon and emergency crews went immediately to the site. She didn't identify the dead.

A phone message left by The Associated Press wasn't immediately returned by Banks late Saturday.

Arlene Salac, with the Federal Aviation Administration, said in an FAA statement emailed to AP that the Lancair IV-P aircraft crashed at 2:35 p.m. The statement didn't give the plane's intended destination or other crash details. It said the FAA would investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board would determine the probable cause.





Brittany Kerfoot 




Britt Knight


NTSB Identification: LAX07LA184
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Saturday, June 02, 2007 in Parowan, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/31/2008
Aircraft: Brook Lancair IV-P, registration: N401PT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was about 1 hour 15 minutes into the flight, and the airplane was cruising at 26,000 feet, when the turbo prop engine lost power with white smoke coming out of the exhaust. About a minute before the pilot had observed what he termed "splats" of moisture on the windscreen. He performed an emergency descent and at 12,500 feet attempted an engine restart. The restart attempt was unsuccessful. He glided to the nearest airport, circled, and performed a power-off landing. The airplane crossed the runway threshold at 120 knots, floated, and touched down at mid field. After touchdown, the airplane continued down the runway, off the end, and into terrain and a fence. The airplane came to rest with the landing gear collapsed. Federal Aviation Administration inspectors examined the airplane, and could not identify any mechanical abnormality with the engine or fuel system. The Pilot Operating Handbook states that an engine relight was possible below 13,000 feet mean sea level, and below 160 knots of airspeed. The pilot could not recall what his airspeed was when he attempted the engine restart. The airplane was not equipped with any type of engine inlet anti-ice or deicing equipment. The pilot did state that he had been in and out of moisture while at his 26,000 feet cruising altitude, but there had been no ice buildup on his wings or windscreen. A technical representative for Lancair stated that a 3/4 blockage of the engine cowling NACA induction scoop might be enough to starve the engine of air and induce a flameout.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to engine inlet icing. Contributing to the accident was the lack of engine inlet anti-icing capability.

On June 2, 2007, about 1315 mountain daylight time, an amateur built Brook Lancair IV-P, N401PT, made a forced landing following a loss of engine power at Parowan Airport, Parowan, Utah. The private pilot operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The pilot and single passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an IFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at Deer Valley Airport, Phoenix, Arizona, at 1100, and was en route to Hailey, Idaho.

The pilot reported to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator that he was about 1 hour 15 minutes into the flight, and the airplane was cruising at 26,000 feet, when the turbo prop engine quit with white smoke coming out of the exhaust. About a minute before he had observed "splats" of moisture on the windscreen. He performed an emergency descent to 15,000 feet, and at 12,500 feet attempted an engine restart. The restart attempt was unsuccessful. He proceeded to the nearest airport, which was Parowan Airport. He circled and performed a no-power approach to runway 04. The airplane crossed the runway threshold at 120 knots, floated, and touched down at mid field. After touchdown, the airplane continued down the runway, off the end, and into terrain and a fence. The airplane came to rest with the landing gear collapsed.

Federal Aviation Administration inspectors examined the airplane at the Parowan Airport. The inspectors determined that the wing vents were clear of debris; the center fuel tank vent was operational; the fuel boost pumps were energized and operated; the fuel system was clean; the engine igniters operated; the engine controls were properly connected to the engine; the engine rotated freely with no binding; and the engine driven fuel pump was operationally checked to function.

The Pilot Operating Handbook states that an engine relight was possible below 13,000 feet mean sea level, and below 160 knots of airspeed. The pilot could not recall what his airspeed was when he attempted the engine restart. The airplane was not equipped with any type of engine inlet anti-ice or deicing equipment. The pilot did state that he had been in and out of moisture while at his 26,000 feet cruising altitude, but there had been no ice buildup on his wings or windscreen. A technical representative for Lancair stated that a 3/4 blockage of the cowling NACA induction scoop might be enough to starve the engine of air and induce a flameout.

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