Thursday, January 7, 2016

West Atlantic Sweden Canadair CRJ-200, SE-DUX: Fatal accident occurred January 07, 2016 near Akkajaure, Sweden

NTSB Identification: DCA16WA045
Accident occurred Friday, January 08, 2016 in Kiruna, Sweden
Aircraft: BOMBARDIER CL600 2B19, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Sweden has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a BOMBARDIER CL600-2B19 that occurred on January 08, 2016. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Sweden's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer and Design of the engines.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Sweden.




Emergency services have said it is unlikely they will find survivors or a crash in Swedish Lapland, which happened as two pilots were transporting mail in northern Norway.

The plane was on its way from Norwegian airport Gardermoen to Tromsø when it sent out a distress signal in Swedish airspace at 11.31pm on Thursday night.

West Atlantic -- the plane's operator -- did not immediately identify the crew but said that the captain was aged 42 and from Spain, and the first officer was aged 34 and from France. Between them they had logged more than 6,000 flight hours.

On Friday morning the CEO of the company told a press conference in Gothenburg he had "great sorrow" that the accident had taken place.

"What should not happen and may not happen has happened," Gustaf Thureborn said to reporters.

Police and mountain rescue teams arrived at the site at around 1pm on Friday, after being delayed by treacherous conditions.

However Swedish emergency services reported later on Friday afternoon that it was likely the pilots had died in the crash and said that staff were no longer looking for survivors.

The cause of the crash remains a mystery, officials said.

A Norwegian F16 plane first located the wreckage on the ground between the north-western edge of Swedish lake Akkajaure and the Norwegian border, in an area often known as the Swedish alps.

Thureborn told reporters he was woken up by a phone call two minutes after the airline was alerted about the crash and was at the office 15 minutes later.

The aircraft, a Bombardier CRJ-200, is registered in Sweden, but travels between Norwegian destinations. It was manufactured in 1993.

Thureborn told reporters that all of the company's planes of the same model had been grounded as a precaution.

"In light of the ongoing investigation we can't give you more information about what has happened, but we'll have to await its results. We're happy to offer more information as soon as we have it," he added.

Source:  http://www.thelocal.no









Two pilots from France and Spain were on board a mail plane that crashed on its way from Sweden to Norway, the aircraft's operator has confirmed.

West Atlantic's CEO's Gustaf Thureborn told a press conference in Gothenburg "with great sorrow" that the accident had taken place on Thursday night.

"What should not happen and may not happen has happened," he told reporters.

Two people were on board the aircraft, which was carrying mail for the Norwegian postal service. It was on its way from Norwegian Gardermoen to Tromsø when it sent out a distress signal in Swedish airspace at 11.31pm, Thureborn said.

West Atlantic did not immediately identify the crew but said that the captain was aged 42 and from Spain, and the first officer was aged 34 and from France. Between them they had logged more than 6,000 flight hours.

The company said it had not yet been established whether or not the staff had died in the crash.

A Norwegian F16 plane located the wreckage on the ground between the north-western edge of Swedish lake Akkajaure and the Norwegian border, in an area often known as the Swedish alps.

Thureborn told reporters he had been woken up by a phone call two minutes after the airline was alerted about the crash and was at the office 15 minutes later.

Police and mountain rescue teams were still on their way to the scene amid sub-freezing temperarures at 11am.

“The terrain is mountainous and it's -30C, so it's going to take a while before we get there,” police spokesperson Maria Jakobsson told the TT newswire earlier in the morning.

“They sent a very brief 'mayday' and then the plane disappeared from our radar. (…) The weather conditions weren't harsh,” Daniel Lindblad, Swedish Maritime Administration press officer, also told TT.

“The crash site is very clear. Its total diameter is about 50 metres and there are no large parts but only small fragments left of the aircraft,” he added.

The plane, Canadair CRJ-200, is registered in Sweden, but travels between Norwegian destinations. It was manufactured in 1993.

Thureborn told reporters that all of the company's planes of the same model had been grounded as a precaution.

"In light of the ongoing investigation we can't give you more information about what has happened, but we'll have to await its results. We're happy to offer more information as soon as we have it," he added.

Source: http://www.thelocal.se



West Atlantic's CEO's Gustaf Thureborn holding a press conference on Friday morning.


Following the accident involving the aircraft SE-DUX West Atlantic Sweden AB will hold a press conference at 11:00 at Best Western Tidbloms Hotel with address Olskroksgatan 23, SE 416-66 Gothenburg.

The aircraft departed Oslo on route to Tromsö and declared mayday at 23:31 whereby the Swedish and Norwegian search and rescue teams were notified. The crash site was located at 03:10 near the Norwegian border by the lake Akkajaure in the Swedish Lapplandsfjällen by air rescue services with support from Hovedredningssentralen in Norway.  

The search has been taken over by the Swedish police which are on their way to the accident site. The internal process is coordinated by the Company's Emergency Response Team.

Route
Flight no: SWN 294
Route: Oslo - Tromsö
Crew members on board: 2
Type of freight: General freight / Post

Aircraft
Registration: SE-DUX
Aircraft Type: Bombardier CRJ200 PF
Year of manufacture: 1993
Manufacturer's serial number: 7010
Hours flown since manufactured: 38 601:49
Total flight cycles since manufactured: 31 036

West Atlantic Sweden AB has operated the aircraft since 2007 and flown approximately 10 000 hours.

Crew
Age: Captain 42, First Officer 34  
Employed with the company: 2011 and 2008
Flight hours: Captain 2 050 hours on type, total hours 3 173
First officer: 900 hours on type, total hours 3 050

For further information, please contact: 
Gustaf Thureborn, CEO & President                             
Telephone: +46 (0) 10 452 95 07 
Email: Gustaf.Thureborn@westatlantic.eu

About West Atlantic
The West Atlantic Group is one of the market leading providers of dedicated air freight services to European NMOs and air freight capacity to Global Integrators and Freight Forwarders. The Group has a well-established geographic network, based around six logistic hubs, and currently operates 51 scheduled destinations. The aircraft portfolio includes 46 customised aircraft in service, whereof a majority is wholly owned. West Atlantic was founded in 1962 and is headquartered in Gothenburg, Sweden. Operations are performed all over Europe and per December 31 2014 West Atlantic had 488 employees. For 2014 West Atlantic reported revenues of MSEK 1,244 and adjusted EBITDA of MSEK 224.

West Atlantic AB (publ) Org. no: 556503-6083, Box 5433, SE-402 29 Gothenburg, Sweden

Investor Relations: investor.relations@westatlantic.eu
Webpage: www.westatlantic.eu

West Atlantic discloses the information in this release pursuant to the Swedish Securities Market Act and/or the Swedish Financial Instrument Trading Act.  

Source:  http://globenewswire.com



Only small fragments remained of a cargo jet that crashed during the night while transporting mail for the Norwegian postal service Posten. Postal officials were expressing shock and sorrow Friday morning after news came that the crash killed the jet’s two cockpit crew members on board, and all its mail was lost.

“We are all very upset by this tragedy,” John Eckhoff, spokesman for Posten Norge, told state broadcaster NRK. Postal officials kept contact through the night with both the cargo jet’s operator, West Atlantic Sweden of Gothenburg, and rescue crews in both Norway and Sweden.

‘Powerful crash’

The latter could confirm Friday morning that remote crash site had been found shortly after 3am and there was no chance either the pilot or co-pilot could have survived. Only small fragments of the aircraft could be seen in the Swedish mountains of Gällivare.

“It was a powerful crash, right into the ground,” Daniel Lindblad, spokesman for the Swedish rescue service, told news bureau NTB. The pilot, age 42, was from Spain and the co-pilot, age 34, was from France.

“This is a serious and tragic accident,” Posten’s chief executive Dag Mejdell said at a press conference Friday morning. “We have the deepest sympathy for the families of those involved.” He said Posten had set up a crisis team and was working closely with officials at West Atlantic.

They were flying first-class mail (A-post), small packages and express mail from all over southeastern Norway to Northern Norway, on a route from Oslo to Tromsø. Posten Norge suspended another cargo flight that was scheduled to carry mail to Svalbard on Friday. “Its pilots were colleagues of the two who were on board the flight that crashed,” Eckhoff told NRK.

‘Mayday’ around midnight

The Swedish-registered SE-DUX aircraft, flight SWN 294, was a Canadair Bombardier CRJ-200 and it sent out a Mayday signal around midnight. The last radar images of the flight appeared when it was 120 kilometers northeast of Bodø but inside Swedish territory.

Two Norwegian F16 fighter jets were dispatched from the military air station in Bodø and they found the crash site, after which Swedish authorities took over the rescue operation. They determined that neither of the two on board could have survived, but they were attempting to send crews into the remote area located between Lake Akkajaure in Sweden and the Norwegian border.

There are no roads in the wilderness area, making the recovery operation difficult. “We’re working with getting crews into the area,” Maria Jakobssen of the Swedish police told Sveriges Radio. “There are no roads and it’s around 30-degrees below zero, so it’s problematic.”

The cause of the crash could not immediately be determined. The weather was cold but clear, with little wind, reported NRK. Flightradar 24 reported that the aircraft fell quickly, from an altitude of 33,000 feet to 11,725 feet in just 60 seconds. West Atlantic Sweden AB, which planned a midday press conference, is billed as one of the leading providers of air freight services and reported that the aircraft had been part of West Atlantic Sweden’s fleet since 2007.

Source:  http://www.newsinenglish.no

Two pilots from France and Spain were on board a mail plane that crashed on its way from Sweden to Norway, the aircraft operator has confirmed.

West Atlantic's CEO's Gustaf Thureborn told a press conference in Gothenburg "with great sorrow" that the accident had taken place on Thursday night.

"What should not happen and may not happen has happened," he told reporters.

Two people were on board the aircraft, which was carrying mail for the Norwegian postal service. It was on its way from Norwegian Gardemoen to Tromsø when it sent out a distress signal in Swedish airspace at 11.31pm, Thurebor said.

West Atlantic did not immediately identify the crew but said that the captain was aged 42 and from Spain, and the first officer was aged 34 and from France. Between them they had logged more than 6,000 flight hours.

The company said it had not yet been established whether or not the staff had died in the crash.

A Norwegian F16 plane located the wreckage on the ground between the north-western edge of Swedish lake Akkajaure and the Norwegian border, in an area often known as the Swedish alps.

Thureborn told reporters he had been woken up by a phone call two minutes after the airline was alerted about the crash and was at the office 15 minutes later.

Police and mountain rescue teams were still on their way to the scene amid sub-freezing temperarures at 11am.

“The terrain is mountainous and it's -30C, so it's going to take a while before we get there,” police spokesperson Maria Jakobsson told the TT newswire earlier in the morning.

“They sent a very brief 'mayday' and then the plane disappeared from our radar. (…) The weather conditions weren't harsh,” Daniel Lindblad, Swedish Maritime Administration press officer, also told TT.

“The crash site is very clear. Its total diameter is about 50 metres and there are no large parts but only small fragments left of the aircraft,” he added.

The plane, Canadair CL-600-2B19 Regional Jet CRJ-200PF, is registered in Sweden, but travels between Norwegian destinations. It was manufactured in 1993.

"In light of the ongoing investigation we can't give you more information about what has happened, but we'll have to await its results. We're happy to offer more information as soon as we have it," Thureborn told the press conference.

Source:  http://www.thelocal.no

Mangled remains of a plane have been found after it sent out a distress signal over the border between Norway and Sweden. 

The Canadair CRJ-200, which had taken off from Oslo just an hour earlier, went down in a remote, mountainous area between the Nordic countries in the middle of the night.

Rescuers were still trying to access to crash site Friday morning after which had been seen by passing. 

Everyone on board the Canadair CRJ-200 is feared dead.

The flight, a cargo plane carrying post, was traveling to the northern city of Trosmo.

It was operated by Swedish firm West Atlantic.

Two people - the 42-year-old captain and a 34-year-old first officer - were on board at the time.

The airline says both crew members were experienced pilots, with more than 3,000 hours experience in the Canadair CRJ-200 between them.

According to tracking service FlightRadar24, the plane's last signal showed it at 33,000ft just after midnight local time.

The Canadair CRJ 200 had caused alarm after not making contact since it sent out the distress signal between Norway’s Lake Akkajaure and the Swedish Lapland Mountains.

The wreckage was first spotted by a Norwegian F-16 reconnaissance jet at around 3am.

Two Europeans are believed to have been on board the Swedish registered postal flight, which was traveling to Tromso, Norway.

Early reports in Sweden suggested the flight had taken off from Heathrow, but these were corrected by the airline.

Story, comments and photos: http://www.express.co.uk

To norske F-16 fra Bodø var de første til å lokalisere postflyet som styrtet i Nord-Sverige. Her er videoen.

– Filmen viser havaristedet og de første helikopterne på vei inn. Som filmen viser var det allerede for sent da helikopterne kom, forteller Kaptein Brynjar Stordal ved Forsvarets operative hovedkvarter (FOH).

Bildene viser krateret der flyet styrtet. Jagerflyene har avanserte systemer for å finne mål på bakken, og dette systemet kan også brukes til å lete etter savnede fly.

– Målangivelsesutstyret på F-16 har opptikk som gjør det i stand til å fungere godt i denne type søk, fortsetter Stordal.

http://www.nrk.no

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