Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Evolution REVO, Evolution Aircraft Inc., N107SB: Fatal accident occurred February 16, 2016 at Buckeye Municipal Airport (KBXK), Maricopa County, Arizona

EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N107SB


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA071
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 16, 2016 in Buckeye, AZ
Aircraft: Evolution Revo, registration: N107SB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 16, 2016, about 1452 mountain standard time, an Evolution Revo light sport weight-shift control "trike," N107SB, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Buckeye Municipal airport (BXK), Buckeye, Arizona. The pilot, who was the sole person on board, received fatal injuries, and the aircraft was substantially damaged. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan was filed for the flight.

According to the owner of the aircraft, the pilot was a friend of a friend, and was visiting the area. The pilot had some free time, and urged the owner to be allowed to fly the aircraft. Based on the pilot's credentials and behavior, the owner eventually agreed to let the pilot fly the aircraft. The evening prior to the accident, the owner (acting as pilot-in-command) took the accident pilot (as a passenger) on an uneventful flight in the aircraft. On the day of the accident, both individuals conducted the preflight inspection, with no anomalies noted.

The pilot reportedly planned to conduct a solo flight, and then return for an unspecified passenger. According to the owner, the takeoff roll on runway 17 was normal, but shortly after breaking ground, the wing went to the "full flare" position, which he explained to mean that the wing was at the full wing leading edge up position. The wing remained in that position, and the aircraft climbed rapidly and steeply, but then appeared to stall, at an altitude the owner estimated to be about 100 to 150 feet above ground level. The aircraft then "rounded out," and descended rapidly to the ground in a nose-down attitude. The aircraft was equipped with a Ballistic Recovery System brand rocket propelled parachute, but the device was not activated by the pilot.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial certificate with airplane single engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings, and "sport endorsements" for gyroplane and powered parachutes. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings, and "sport endorsements" for gyroplane and powered parachutes. The pilot's most recent valid FAA medical certificate was obtained in 2004, and had expired; he was operating under the conditions of the light sport medical requirements. On that 2004 medical certificate application, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 4,500 hours.

FAA information indicated that the aircraft was manufactured in 2015, and was equipped with a Rotax 912-IS series engine. The wreckage was examined on site by FAA inspectors, and was recovered to a secure location for possible subsequent examination.

The BXK 1455 automated weather observation included winds from 130 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 27 degrees C, dew point minus 2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.93 inches of mercury.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Pilot James George III of Fargo on April 22, 2005.


BUCKEYE, Ariz. – A West Fargo man died Tuesday when the motorized hang glider he was piloting crashed on takeoff from a municipal airport in Buckeye, which is about 40 miles from Phoenix, according to the Buckeye Police Department.

A report issued by the police department identified the pilot as James George III, 55.

The cause of the crash has not been determined, and the case has been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation and Safety Board.

The incident happened just before 2 p.m. Tuesday.

George was previously in a serious plane crash in February 2005, when the plane he was piloting crashed-landed in a north Fargo home’s front yard.

Both George and a passenger in the plane were seriously injured in the crash, which happened when the plane’s engine seized shortly after takeoff from Hector International Airport.

It was later determined that a mechanic had improperly installed an oil filter on the plane, according to Forum archives.

At the time of the crash, George operated Eagle 1 Aviation, a flight instruction, aircraft rental and sales business.

In the aftermath of the crash, fellow pilots credited George’s skills as a pilot for avoiding injuries to anyone on the ground.

Vic Gelking, who runs Vic’s Airfield in Fargo, a flight-training business, was a friend of George and knew him well as a fellow pilot.

“He did some flying for me recently,” Gelking said, adding that after the 2005 crash George became a “pretty cautious” pilot.

Gelking said in addition to doing some freelance pilot-training work, George operated a trucking business.

Gelking said he had heard about the crash in Arizona, but he wasn’t sure what type of aircraft George was flying, other than it may have been a type of ultralight aircraft.

Such aircraft are usually known to be fairly safe to fly, he said.

The police report on Tuesday’s incident stated George was an experienced pilot who in the past had flown the type of aircraft that crashed. The report identified the aircraft as a Revo weight-shift control trike, which resembles a three-wheeled motor bike with a V-shaped wing attached overhead.

Shawn Dobberstein, executive director of the Fargo airport, said he remembered George as someone who was always enthusiastic and excited about aviation.

Dobberstein also said that George did a great job of training other pilots, though he said George appeared to cut back on those activities after his crash landing in 2005.

Story and video:  http://www.inforum.com

James George III



BUCKEYE, AZ - Authorities say a North Dakota man is dead after a powered hang glider crashed  while taking off from an airport in the Phoenix area.

Buckeye police say the only person aboard the aircraft when it crashed Tuesday afternoon at Buckeye Municipal Airport was the pilot, 55-year-old James George III of West Fargo, North Dakota, who was killed.

Police say the cause of the crash isn't immediately known and that federal agencies are investigating.

Police say the hang glider belonged to a Buckeye resident.

Buckeye Airport Coordinator John McMahon had just talked to the victim two hours before he died.

"Just talked to him at lunch and just to hear about his experience and about what he'd done in the past, and then to realize later on that he had been in an accident, it was difficult to see, ok, what--how is his family going to feel," McMahon said.

His job is to manage the airport, so he comes in contact with people landing on the runway every day. 

"I would say everybody was familiar with the aircraft, and knowing what happened is just a sobering thought, recognizing that could happen to any of us," McMahon said

George and a passenger were seriously injured in 2005 when a single-engine plane he was piloting crashed in Fargo, North Dakota, after it lost power shortly after takeoff.

Investigators determined that a mechanic had improperly installed an oil filter on the plane, causing a large oil leak.

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com




BUCKEYE, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - One person was killed when a single-engine aircraft went down in the area of the Buckeye Airport Tuesday afternoon, according to Buckeye police.


The pilot has been identified as James George III, 55, of West Fargo, ND


A number of police and fire units were at the scene.


Pictures from our news helicopter showed the wreckage in scrub grass just off a paved roadway.


The aircraft involved was a single-engine Evolution REVO light sport aircraft, a powered hang glider, with one person aboard, according to Lynn Lunsford with the Federal Aviation Administration. 


"The owners of the airplane were not involved," said Office Tamela Skaggs with the Buckeye Police Department. The glider is registered to a Buckeye resident.


"George, who was an experienced pilot, has flown aircrafts (sic) of this type before," Skaggs said in an email update. "George was taking off from the Buckeye Airport and it is unknown at this time what caused the aircraft to crash."


The runway at Buckeye Airport was closed during the investigation.


Story and video:   http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com








Buckeye AZ Police Department
Plane Crash Press Release

On February 16, 2016 at about 1:52 pm, the Buckeye Police Department received several 911 calls about a plane crash at the Buckeye Municipal Airport located at 3000 S Palo Verde Rd, Buckeye Az. 


Upon the arrival of Buckeye Police Officers they identified the scene as a single engine aircraft that crashed on the property of the Buckeye Airport with one occupant who was pronounced deceased at the scene. 


The owners of the aircraft were not involved, and the occupant has not yet been identified. 


At this time how the crash happened is unknown as the scene is now being investigated. 


The Buckeye Police Department, FAA, and NTSB will be working together to investigate this incident.






One person was killed when a small aircraft crashed at Buckeye Municipal Airport Tuesday afternoon, police said.


Only the pilot had been aboard the single-engine Evolution REVO light sport aircraft when it went down, according to an Federal Aviation Administration official.


Buckeye Police Department received multiple 911 calls regarding a crash at the airport, 3000 S. Palo Verde Road, at about 1:52 p.m., a police spokesman said.


The owners of the aircraft were not involved with the crash and the occupant’s identity is still unknown, police said.


Authorities said that the police department, FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are working together in investigating the incident.


Source:  http://www.azcentral.com







NTSB Identification: CHI05CA074
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 26, 2005 in Fargo, ND
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/08/2005
Aircraft: Cessna 177RG, registration: N1623H
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The aircraft experienced a total loss of engine power during initial climb after takeoff. The accident flight was the first flight after the oil filter had been replaced. The pilot reported that the engine began losing power about two miles south of the departure airport. He stated that the engine seized during a turn back toward the airport. He reported that the airplane did not have enough altitude remaining to glide to a runway and that he performed a downwind landing to a nearby road because there was "no place to go into the wind, even knowing I had a 29 [knot] tailwind." The pilot reported that the airplane impacted a street light and vehicle during the forced landing to a residential area. The pilot estimated that less than 30-seconds transpired between the loss of engine power and the impact with terrain. Post accident inspection of the engine revealed that the number four connecting rod had separated and protruded through the top of the engine case. An oil film covered the oil filter, the accessory case below the oil filter, and the bottom of the fuselage. The oil system was pressurized and a leak was noted around the base of the oil filter canister. Further inspection revealed that the oil filter canister bolt was not adequately torqued and its retaining safety-wire was incorrectly installed. Additionally, the canister base gasket was incorrectly installed which allowed oil to leak out from the canister base. No leaks were noted after the gasket was repositioned and the canister was reinstalled. The pilot reported that the oil-pressure was "in green" during an engine run-up check completed prior to takeoff. Several individuals reported there was an approximately 4-foot diameter oil spill in the ramp area used by the accident airplane for start-up and pre-takeoff operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The mechanic's improper installation of the oil filter canister base gasket, which resulted in an oil leak and the separation of the connecting rod due to oil starvation. Factors to the accident were the unsuitable terrain encountered during the forced landing, the tailwind condition, the light pole, and the vehicle.

On February 26, 2005, at 1403 central standard time, a Cessna 177RG, N1623H, piloted by a commercial pilot, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during initial climb from runway 18 (9,000 feet by 150 feet, grooved concrete) at Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The airplane delivery flight was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91 without a flight plan. The pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries. The flight was destined for Festus Memorial Airport (FES), Festus, Missouri.

The airplane was recently sold and a pre-buy inspection of the airplane was completed on February 23, 2005, as a condition of the sale. During this inspection the engine oil filter was replaced. The accident flight was the first leg of a delivery flight from FAR to Charlotte, North Carolina. The airplane had accumulated 0.1 hours since the pre-buy inspection.

The pilot reported that the engine began losing power about two miles south of FAR. The pilot stated that he began a turn back toward FAR and informed air traffic control (ATC) of the loss of engine power. The pilot reported that the engine seized during the turn back to the airport and the airplane did not have enough altitude remaining to glide to a runway. The pilot performed a downwind landing to a nearby road because there was "no place to go into the wind, even knowing I had a 29 [knot] tailwind." The pilot reported that the airplane impacted a street light and vehicle during the forced landing to a residential area. The pilot estimated that less than 30-seconds transpired between the loss of engine power and the impact with terrain. The pilot reported that the oil-pressure was "in green" during an engine run-up check completed prior to takeoff. Several individuals reported there was an approximately 4-foot diameter oil spill on the ramp area used by the accident airplane for start-up and pre-takeoff operations.

Inspection of the engine revealed that the number four connecting rod had separated and protruded through the top of the engine case. An oil film covered the oil filter, the accessory case below the oil filter, and the bottom of the fuselage. The oil system was pressurized with nitrogen and a leak was noted around the base of the oil filter canister. The oil filter safety-wire was tensioned to the counter-clockwise (left) direction. A torque-wrench was used to measure the installation torque of the canister bolt. The bolt began tightening at 15 ft/lbs and the bolt had rotated 90-degrees at 25 ft/lbs. The recommended torque value for the canister bolt is 20 to 25 ft/lbs. The leak at the oil fileter canister base persisted after the canister bolt had been retorqued. The oil filter canister was removed and approximately 1/4 of the canister base gasket circumference was observed to be displaced (folded) to the inside of the canister sealing surface. No leaks were noted after the gasket was repositioned and the canister was reinstalled and torqued to 15 ft/lbs.

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