Friday, February 12, 2016

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, N2209W, Electrical Training USA LLC: Fatal accident occurred February 11, 2016 in the Gulf of Mexico offshore of Destin, Okaloosa County, Florida

Family members of Sheryl Roe and Jim Shumberg, a Texas couple killed last week in a Destin plane crash, are hoping to find and thank the man who called 911.



Jim Shumberg & Sheryl Roe were killed in small plane crash near Destin, Florida.





Family members of the Texas couple killed in Thursday’s plane crash near Destin have someone they want to thank.


They just don’t know who he is.


A man who identified himself as a runner on the beach at the time of the crash called 911, alerting authorities that a plane had crashed into the Gulf of Mexico.


Within two hours, crews had found the body of Sheryl Roe. Less than an hour later, they recovered the body of her long-time companion and pilot, Jim Shumberg.


“We were so blessed that he just happened to be there at that moment,” said Tina Brewster, Roe’s sister, of the 911 caller. “If he hadn’t, we never would have known what happened.


“I personally feel that it was fate that he was there.”


Brewster said they’re hoping to personally thank the man, who was apparently staying at Silver Beach West. Public record law prohibits the release of the man’s name, or the contents of the recording of the 911 call.


Roe and Shumberg were frequent visitors to the area, with Roe having acupuncture offices in Navarre and Fort Walton Beach. The two had been together for more than 20 years, according to family members.

Brewster said her sister loved to fly with Shumberg.


“Jim was a seasoned pilot,” she said. “I let him take my children up in that plane. Absolutely none of us think that this was something he did.”


The National Transportation Safety Board has not released its preliminary findings of the crash. Brewster said family members are awaiting additional information anxiously.


“There’s a lot of people drumming their fingers, waiting for that report,” she said. “That small plane was his baby. He absolutely loved that plane.”



The plane went down in clear weather near Henderson Beach State Park just before 7 p.m. Thursday.

The couple, who were in their 60s, met at what family members recall as an Eagles concert more than 20 years ago.


Shumberg had been flying for about five years, Roe said.


“Jim was an amazing man,” she said. “After all Sheryl had been through, she had some big walls up, but in the end they were perfect for each other.


“It’s one small consolation that they were together when this happened, because neither could have made it without the other.”


Story and photo: http://www.nwfdailynews.com


Electrical Training USA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2209W

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Destin, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2209W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 12, 2016, about 1850 central standard time (CST), a Piper PA-28-181, N2209W, was destroyed during collision with water while maneuvering to land at Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida. The private pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. The flight departed Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 1715. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91.

According to preliminary radar data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as well as witness accounts, the airplane approached DTS from the west, and transitioned along the shore on the south side of the airport for landing on runway 32. Witnesses reported the pilot announced a go-around on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), and the radar track depicted the airplane crossing the approach end of runway 32, then turning upwind on the east side of the runway. The airplane continued in a left-hand circuit around the airport and its altitude varied between 500 and 700 feet mean sea level (msl).

The radar depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for landing on runway 32. Instead of continuing to an approximate heading of 050 degrees for the base leg of the traffic pattern, the airplane rolled out on an approximate heading of 090 degrees, and flew through the final approach course, west to east, as it tracked parallel to the coast. The airplane then turned 90 degrees to the south and tracked out over the water. The last radar target showed the airplane at 175 feet msl at 128 knots groundspeed.

A witness who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane reported he heard the accident pilot announce his go-around and his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot's last radio call announced he would be "circling somewhere." There were no further communications from the accident airplane. The witness reported windy conditions as he approached DTS, and that conditions were "extremely bumpy" below 300 feet.

A witness who was jogging in an easterly direction along the beach reported to an FAA inspector that his attention was drawn to the airplane as it crossed the beach and headed south over the water. He stated that the engine was running, but the front of the airplane was illuminated as if the engine was "on fire." The witness stated he thought the airplane was in a wings-level attitude, not turning, but descending rapidly. He said that when the airplane struck the water, he heard an explosion and the light at the front of the airplane "went out."

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on March 3, 2014. The pilot reported 306 total hours of flight experience on that date. The pilot did not possess an instrument rating.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1979 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series engine. The maintenance logbooks for the airplane were not recovered, but copies of logbook entries revealed the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed May 8, 2015, at 2,239 total aircraft hours. On February 9, 2016, the engine oil was changed at 2,272 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was recovered from the Gulf of Mexico and moved to a secure facility for a detailed examination at a later date. According to the FAA inspector on site during the recovery, the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. Except for a large section of the right wing, all major components of the airplane were accounted for. The engine, with the propeller attached, was completely entangled with the instrument panel, control cables, and wiring. All damage appeared consistent with impact and overload.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov














 


A couple with ties to both the Emerald Coast and Texas were killed Thursday when their single-engine plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico.

James Shumberg, 67, whose primary address is in Alvin, Texas; and Sheryl Roe, 60, an acupuncturist with offices in Navarre and Fort Walton Beach, were flying a PA-28-181 Piper Archer aircraft when it went down in the Gulf around 6:52 p.m. The plane was registered to Electrical Training USA, a vocational school for which Shumberg, a licensed pilot, was listed as the owner.

Emergency responders from numerous agencies responded to the coastline between Henderson Beach State Park and the Walton County line after a man called 911 to report seeing a small plane go down while he was jogging on the beach. Rescue personnel on the shore, in the water and in the air searched the area for more than two hours before recovering Roe’s body around 9 p.m. Shumberg’s body was located approximately 45 minutes later.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash. FAA officials told The Log the flight departed Jack Brooks Regional Airport in Beaumont, Texas enroute to Destin Executive Airport.

According to employees at the Destin Executive Airport, Shumberg was a frequent visitor to the facility and a veteran pilot.

In a Facebook post, Roe’s daughter, Sibbian Roe, indicated that her mother and Shumberg, whom she referred to as her stepdad, were on their way to a week-long vacation in the Florida Keys.

Mary Esther businesswoman Susan Gadd was shocked to learn about the accident on Friday morning. For many years, Roe worked in a building near Gadd’s hair salon on Mary Esther Boulevard.

“Oh my God - I can’t believe this,” she said. “She and James had been together for more than 20 years. They were always going back and forth to visit each other between Texas and Florida. Sometimes she would drive, and sometimes he would pick her up in the plane.”

Gadd said that Roe, a former nurse, loved living in Florida.

“She had a beautiful family - children and grandchildren,” she said.

According to Michele Nicholson, a spokeswoman for the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office, debris from the crash washed ashore over an extensive area. On Friday morning, two men walking along the beach west of the Crab Trap restaurant located what appeared to be a flotation device with the tail number of the airplane.

“We heard the roar of a plane go overhead last night, but didn’t really pay much attention to it,” said Ross Aldrich, who is visiting Destin from Terrace Park, Ohio. “It started getting busier outside, so we came out and saw trucks on the beach, and vehicles with lights flashing. We knew they were looking for something.”

Mary Beth Coleman, a snowbird from Canada, was taking her usual early morning walk on the beach when she came across what appeared to be debris from the plane.

“I hadn’t heard about this,” she said of the crash. “I come out here every morning to see the sun come up. It’s so sad to think those people will never enjoy another sunrise.”

Source: http://www.thedestinlog.com

DESTIN — The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office announced early Friday morning that two bodies have been recovered in connection with the crash of a single-engine plane in the Gulf of Mexico just offshore of Destin on Thursday evening.

A 911 call was received by dispatchers at 6:52 p.m. from a man who said he saw a small prop plane go down near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area as he was running on the beach. First responders converged on the area and began searching along the coastline while the Coast Guard searched the water.

They located debris and personal items scattered along the coast from the area between Henderson Beach and the Walton County line.

Officials at the Destin Executive Airport reported that a Piper Archer was overdue.

The plane was registered in Texas. Walton County Sheriff’s deputies assisting with the search reported finding the first victim, a female, in the water around 9 p.m. A male victim was found approximately 45 minutes later. No other individuals were believed to be on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash.

A winter visitor to the area, Ross Aldrich of Terrace Park, Ohio, found an item on the beach from the plane wreckage with its FAA Registry number — N2209W.

According to a search of FAA records, the plane is registered to Electrical Training USA LLC, located in Alvin, Texas. The plane was a Piper PA-28-181, model year 1979. The identities of the victims have yet to be announced.

Original Report

The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office confirmed that a small airplane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area in Destin on Thursday night.

Emergency personnel reported a significant amount of debris had been located that is connected to the crash. First responders were at the scene searching both land and water for possible survivors.

The first 911 call was received at 6:52 p.m. from a runner on the beach, according to a press release from OCSO.

According to the statement, OCSO, Coast Guard, area firefighters and other local emergency agencies have responded to the reported crash site. An aerial search is underway from the state park to the Walton County line.
Investigators at the scene say a plane that may have been involved in the crash was overdue at Destin Airport.

Corey Dobridinia, public information officer for the Walton County Sheriff’s Office, told the Daily News that the initial report involved a SWC Piper aircraft.

 When reached for comment, Arlene Salac, a representative from the Federal Aviation Administration, provided the following statement to The Destin Log:

"A Piper PA28 crashed 300 yards off of the coast near Destin, FL tonight. The FAA will investigate. Contact local authorities for information on aircraft passengers."

According to Coast Guard Heartland out of New Orleans, watchstanders with Coast Guard Sector Mobile received a report at approximately 8 p.m. that a single-engine aircraft crashed into the water about one-half mile off Henderson Beach. They directed the launch of a Coast Guard Station Destin 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boatcrew and an Air Station New Orleans MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew.

The Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher also was directed to aid in the search.

As of midnight, no survivors of the crash had been reported.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.nwfdailynews.com





Two bodies have been recovered in connection with the crash of a single engine plane in the Gulf of Mexico just offshore of Destin Thursday evening. 

A 9-1-1 call was received by dispatchers at 6:52 p.m. from a man who said he saw a small prop plane go down near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area as he was running on the beach. 


First responders converged on the area and began searching along the coastline while the Coast Guard searched the water. 


They located debris and personal items scattered along the coast from the area between Henderson Beach and the Walton County line. 


Officials at the Destin Airport reported that a Piper Archer was overdue.


The plane was registered in Texas. Walton County Sheriff’s deputies assisting with the search reported finding the first victim, a female, in the water around 9 p.m. A male victim was found approximately 45 minutes later. 


No other individuals were believed to be on board. 


The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash. 


The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the many agencies and individuals who provided assistance.

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