Thursday, March 24, 2016

North American AT-6A Texan, N7055D, J Simpson Mckibbin Company Inc: Fatal accident occurred March 23, 2016 in Astoria, Clatsop County, Oregon

J SIMPSON MCKIBBIN COMPANY INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7055D 

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA087
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 23, 2016 in Astoria, WA
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN AT 6A, registration: N7055D
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 23, 2016, at 1542 Pacific daylight time, a North American AT-6A, N7055D, impacted the Columbia River near Astoria, Oregon. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The personal flight departed Pearson Field Airport, Vancouver, Washington, at 1506. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and location of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed.

The passenger was seated in the rear of the airplane, and the flight was intended to be for the dispersal of her deceased husband's ashes.

A witness, who was the Captain of a cargo ship moored at an anchorage in the river channel, about 1 mile northeast of Astoria, was on the ship's bridge at the time of the accident. He observed the airplane flying about 300 ft above sea level, approach the ship from the starboard quarter traveling on a north-northeast track. He walked outside to watch as it flew directly overhead and across the port beam. It continued on the same track away from the ship, and a short time later he saw the left wing dip, as the airplane began a left turn. A few seconds later the wings were almost vertical, and the airplane then rapidly transitioned into an aggressive steep vertical dive. The airplane then hit the water in a nose-down attitude, and he saw a red tail section bob back into view, and then sink. The airplane was flying parallel to the water surface leading up to the diversion, and he could hear the engine operating throughout the flight.

Another witness, located inside her apartment close to the waterfront in Astoria, was at a north-facing window with a view of the channel. She observed an airplane directly ahead, flying over the water and east towards and over moored ships. She was familiar with the helicopter traffic from the Columbia Bar Pilots, and the airplane immediately seemed unusual because of its low altitude. It was flying at the same level as the ship's stacks relative to her position, at an altitude typically flown by the helicopters.

The airplane was flying at a speed she considered to be slower than normal, and it then began a slow and "graceful" turn to what appeared to be the left. She likened the maneuver to the way a large commercial airplane turns, and as it progressed she could eventually see the full wing profile. The turn continued, and before completing 180 degrees, the nose of the airplane aggressively dropped, and the airplane transitioned into an almost vertical dive, passing out of view behind a ship. The airplane was flying straight and level up until the diversion.

Both witnesses reported that the airplane was not trailing smoke or vapors at any time, and weather included good visibility, with overcast skies well above the airplane's altitude, and rain beginning later in the day.


The witnesses guided search and rescue personnel from the Coast Guard and Clatsop County Sheriff's Department to the approximate accident location. No wreckage was observed floating in the water, and weather, fast water currents, and low water visibility hampered the search efforts. Two days later, divers from the Sheriff's Department located the wreckage in 15 ft of water, in the middle of the channel, about 1.5 miles northeast of Astoria, and 11 miles east of the river mouth to the Pacific Ocean. The airplane had fragmented, separating the wings, engine, and tail section from the fuselage, which sustained extensive crush damage. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





ASTORIA, Ore. — Construction crews helped pull the wreckage of an antique plane from the Columbia River Tuesday afternoon, several days after a former Clark County commissioner and a friend crashed into the water near Astoria.

John McKibbin was helping his friend Irene Mustain scatter the ashes of her late husband last Wednesday evening. The two took off in his antique plane from Pearson Field in Vancouver, and crashed soon after.

McKibbin's body was pulled from the water last Friday, and he was laid to rest by his friends and family last weekend. Mustain's body was found Monday.

McKibbin, 69, served two terms as a state representative before he was elected to the county commission in 1978. He left office in 1990 to become a real estate developer, but he remained active in the community.

Story and photo gallery:   http://katu.com



John McKibbin

When John McKibbin came calling, you knew you needed to set aside some time and brain cells and get ready for something big. Clark County Commissioner Marc Boldt said pad and paper was always a good idea.

“There was so much energy and so much information coming from him,” Boldt told a vigil in honor of McKibbin on Saturday evening.

Mark Matthias, the owner of Beaches restaurant and a frequent McKibbin collaborator, said every time McKibbin asked for a few minutes of his time, he knew he wouldn’t emerge for hours. He and McKibbin were supposed to have a meeting on Thursday, he said, and there was comedic negotiation by email as the two busy men settled upon exactly 9½ minutes of face time.

“I know that 9½-minute meeting would have been the best 2½ hours of my week,” Matthias said.

Hundreds of people turned out at Pearson Field to honor McKibbin and show love and support for his widow, their daughters and the whole extended family. A gentle rain started to fall toward the end of the 45-minute vigil, but that didn’t stop folks from lighting candles and holding them aloft.

McKibbin, 69, and passenger Irene Mustain, 64, died Wednesday afternoon while on a mission to scatter the ashes of Mustain’s late husband, Terry Mustain, near the mouth of the Columbia River.

Terry Mustain was a Vietnam veteran and Air Force pilot who died in 2013. Wednesday would have been his 69th birthday; he and Irene had been married for 44 years.

McKibbin and Irene Mustain were flying in McKibbin’s North American AT-6A when it went down on the river near Astoria, Ore.

The AT-6A was built in 1941 and was designed to train military pilots during World War II. It had been fully restored by McKibbin and his friend and fellow pilot George Welsh, and was frequently on display at Pearson. McKibbin was an experienced private pilot. The weather for flying on Wednesday was good, and the reason for the crash is still being investigated.

‘Kiddo’

McKibbin was a popular person with a long résumé in public service in Southwest Washington. He taught contemporary world problems at Columbia River High School and was active in Democratic politics before winning a 49th Legislative District seat in 1974. After serving two terms in the House, he was elected county commissioner in 1978, receiving nearly 71 percent of the vote. He left elected office in 1990 to work in real estate and development, and also served in numerous volunteer and leadership capacities for local civic organizations, including the Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce, Leadership Clark County, Identity Clark County and Evergreen Habitat for Humanity.

“He had an unfailingly, aggressively, relentlessly positive attitude about everything,” state Sen. Ann Rivers, R-La Center, told the crowd Saturday. And when McKibbin would say, “Kiddo, it’s time for a meeting,” or “Kiddo, we’ll get it done,” Rivers knew he meant business.

Kelly Love, a fellow former CEO of the Chamber of Commerce, said McKibbin called her “kiddo,” too. They didn’t always agree, she said, but McKibbin’s “big personality was like a 1,000-watt spotlight.” For such a vital life force to disappear in the Columbia River really gives Love pause, she said.

“John was one of those special, rare people who could reach across divides and disagreements to bring people together,” said state Sen. Annette Cleveland, who knew McKibbin for decades, worked with him and campaigned for him. “As a trusted and highly respected leader, his desire to serve our community and state was limitless.”

John Wells, a good friend, laughed that he “spent a lot of timing sitting behind John in airplanes.” Their friendship grew after the McKibbins hosted a welcome-home party for Wells when he was returning from military service in the early 1970s. They didn’t know him, Wells said, but he was a friend of a friend. That was enough for them.

“He was an incredible individual,” Wells said. “We were supposed to meet again next Wednesday.”

Neighborhood activist Bridget Schwarz, longtime organizer of the Fairgrounds Neighborhood Association, said she admired the way McKibbin “always included people. He was committed to the grass roots, and I guess that’s what I was. I’m like, ‘I mattered to this guy?’ ”

Ron Arp, a local businessman, said McKibbin was keenly interested in replacing the Interstate 5 Bridge and growing aviation opportunities and education at nearby Pearson Field. “He wanted people to be able to land here and live here,” Arp said.

In the time to come, Arp added, if McKibbin’s friends find themselves feeling “that nudge to get involved and make the community better — that’s probably John playing wing man.”

New world

McKibbin was married to Nancy McKibbin for more than 40 years.

“I am so uplifted today” by the crowd and its kind words about her late husband, Nancy said. Some of the amazing things they said about him were things she hadn’t known, she said.

What she does know: “He wasn’t ready to go,” she said. They had many plans for the future, she said.

The couple had two daughters and two grandchildren — including Charlotte, who turned 1 year old on Saturday. Nancy McKibbin introduced her to the crowd and said: “This is my new world.”

Story and photo gallery: http://www.columbian.com


Several hundred people gathered at Pearson Field Historic Hangar on Saturday in a vigil honoring the memory of John McKibbin, who with passenger Irene Mustain died Wednesday in a plane crash in the Columbia River near Astoria, Oregon.



CLATSOP COUNTY, Ore. — A Clatsop County dive team has recovered a plane that crashed into the Columbia River near Astoria Wednesday night, and the bodies of its pilot and passenger. 

The pilot was officially identified as former Clark County commissioner John McKibbin, and his passenger as 64-year-old Irene Mustain.

After several hours of searching Friday morning, the eight-person dive team was able to locate the plane that had broken into numerous pieces and was scattered about the floor of the river.

Around 1:30 p.m. the dive team located McKibbin and successfully retrieved his body from the wreckage. Ms. Mustain was also located but due to the tangled wreckage and position of the fuselage, the divers were unable to retrieve her body.

Mustain's body will be recovered as soon as the appropriate equipment is obtained.

McKibbin and Mustain took off in the antique plane from Pearson Field in Vancouver Wednesday evening so Mustain could scatter the ashes of her late husband.

Soon after, the U.S. Coast Guard got reports of a small plane crashing into the Columbia River near Astoria. Deputies found oil in the water the next day.

McKibbin, 69, served two terms as a state representative before he was elected to the county commission in 1978. He left office in 1990 to become a real estate developer, but he remained active in the community.

A candlelight vigil honoring John McKibbin will be held Saturday, March 26 at 6 p.m. at Pearson Air Field in Vancouver.

Original article can be found here:http://kpic.com



The search continues today for the Vancouver-based personal aircraft that was seen to have crashed into the Columbia River near Astoria, Ore. Wednesday afternoon.

Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said two marine patrol boats and seven divers were back in the water at 9 a.m. this morning to find the airplane carrying Vancouver residents Irene Mustain and pilot John McKibbin.

“We’re not giving up; we’ll continue to keep looking,” he said.

The U.S. Coast Guard assisted in the search for the downed aircraft from the time it was reported until Thursday night. According to a news release its suspended its search “pending aircraft identification.”

Bad weather kept divers out of the river on Thursday, but Bergin described Friday as the “perfect day” for diving. He expects divers will have a three-hour window or longer to search the river before water conditions change.

Sonar imaging of the area show a handful of uncharted objects in the water, but it’s still unclear if it’s the downed plane.

“The sonar is not showing aircraft or anything. It might be an old shipwreck but might be the plane because it’s in the area of oil blotches coming up. So we’re hopeful,” he said.

Hopeful, but still unsure.

“When an aircraft goes in the water its an awful lot like a sail in the air,” he said, suggesting the aircraft could have been pushed downstream by the river current.

The plane went down near Pier 39 at about 3:50 Wednesday afternoon.

The search is centered around an area where the water is about 28 feet deep, but a nearby channel drops to about 90 feet.

Allen Kenitzer, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, said the FAA will not release a statement until after the wreckage has been found.

The crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board.

A news release from the Coast Guard states further agency operations are pending the discovery of the aircraft.

The two were on a mission to scatter the ashes of Mustain’s late husband, Terry Mustain, a Vietnam veteran of the Air Force and a pilot, near the mouth of the Columbia River. Mustain died in 2013; Wednesday would have been his 69th birthday.

They were flying in McKibbin’s aircraft, a North American AT-6A, built of polished aluminum and with the nose and tail painted red. The two-seater plane, of a type used to train pilots during World War II, was based at Pearson Field and has been flown to honor military veterans.


Original article can be found here:   http://www.columbian.com

John McKibbin's AT-6. (Photo by Cliff Scrock)

The Coast Guard has suspended its search for a former county commissioner from Washington after his plane crashed while trying to help a woman scatter the ashes of her deceased husband.

Officials with Clatsop County say they'll continue the search for pilot John McKibbin and his passenger -- the two took off in an antique plane from Pearson Field in Vancouver Wednesday evening.

Soon after, the U.S. Coast Guard soon got reports of a small plane crashing in the Columbia River near Astoria. Deputies found oil in the water Thursday, Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said.

"We are doing a bottom grid search and scanning with sonar to see what we can get for the families," Bergin said.

Bergin confirmed the pilot was McKibbin, a former county commissioner in Clark County. The sheriff said he has yet to confirm the name of the other victim.

McKibbin and the woman were heading to the mouth of the Columbia River to scatter the ashes of the woman's deceased husband, said George Welsh, a friend of McKibbin.

McKibbin was flying a North American AT-6 aircraft, said Welsh, himself a pilot. The two-seater aircraft, silver with red on its nose and tail, is frequently displayed at Pearson and has been flown to honor military veterans.

McKibbin, 69, served two terms as a state representative before he was elected to the county commission in 1978. He left office in 1990 to become a real estate developer, but he remained active in the community.

"One of the things that always struck me about John was he was very caring and had a very good sense of humor," said Jean Ryland, a neighbor of McKibbin's for more than 25 years.

The Coast Guard's portion of the search was suspended just after 4 p.m. Thursday.

"We are searching for a needle in a haystack. We are going to continue to search for the families and see what we can do, but right now we believe this is a recovery mission," Bergin said.

Original article can be found here:  http://kval.com



John McKibbin on Main Street in Downtown Vancouver in 2005.

COLUMBIA RIVER — U.S. Coast Guard personnel from Astoria and Station Cape Disappointment are still searching for a missing man and woman whose antique North American AT-6 military plane reportedly crashed into the Columbia River on March 23.

According to the Vancouver Columbian, the pilot was John McKibbin, 69, a prominent Vancouver citizen with a long history in Southwest Washington politics and public service.

The USCG first heard reports that a plane had crashed into the river, east of the Astoria-Megler Bridge, around 3:50 p.m. on March 23. Winds were gusting to 30 mph in the area at that time.

McKibbin, who was an amateur pilot, was reportedly helping a female passenger scatter her husband’s ashes near the mouth of the Columbia River. The woman’s name has not been released.

On March 24, Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said authorities now believe that McKibbin and the woman were in the plane, and that both perished in the crash.

According to Petty Officer First Class Levi Read, a USCG spokesperson, local helicopter and lifeboat crews went out at first light on Thursday morning to resume a search that was called off at dark on Wednesday night.

Read said that on Thursday morning, searchers were focusing on an area near Pier 39, east of Astoria. However, due to the effects of currents, weather conditions and tides, it is possible that the plane and its passengers have been carried to another part of the River.

Though some media outlets have reported that crews are searching the banks on both sides of the river, Pacific County Sheriff Scott Johnson said at 11 a.m. that his office had not been contacted to assist with the search, leading him to believe the effort is largely focused on the Oregon side of the river.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.chinookobserver.com


The plane co-owned by John McKibbin and George Welsh, a 1941 North American AT-6 (Undated courtesy photo, George Welsh)


John McKibbin, a local pilot and one of Clark County’s best-known citizens of the last four decades, has died when his vintage military plane crashed Wednesday afternoon near Astoria, Ore.

Also missing and believed dead is a family friend. McKibbin and the woman were on a mission to scatter the ashes of her late husband, an Air Force veteran and pilot, near the mouth of the Columbia River.

Sheriff Tom Bergin of Clatsop County, Ore., confirmed the incident to The Columbian this morning. “We believe it is Mr. McKibbin,” he said.

The sheriff said he has yet to confirm the name of the other victim with her family.

McKibbin is a former Clark County commissioner and real estate developer with a long list of local civic duties and awards. He is currently head of Identity Clark County, a civic group.

McKibbin was last seen about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday when he and a Vancouver woman took off in a private plane from Pearson Field in Vancouver, bound for the mouth of the Columbia River, where they planned to scatter the ashes of the woman’s deceased husband, said George Welsh, a pilot and friend who helped McKibbin restore the antique plane he was piloting.

About 3:50 p.m. the U.S. Coast Guard received reports of a private plane crash-landing into the Columbia River east of the Astoria-Megler Bridge, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Norcross, a Coast Guard spokeswoman in Seattle.The Coast Guard has a helicopter, a 47-foot lifeboat and two maritime enforcement specialists on the scene assisting in the search.

The site of the crash was located in the water this morning. Bergin said the sheriff’s office located little blips of oil coming up in the water, which he said is indicative of an aircraft sitting somewhere, but the size of the river, its shifting currents and water’s two-foot maximum visibility make the search very challenging. They plan to put divers in the river later today at slack tide, but even that poses problems.

“When it is slack you have a real small window of 30 minutes to an hour,” he said.

Welsh said McKibbin was flying a North American AT-6 aircraft. The two-seater aircraft, silver with red on its nose and tail, is frequently displayed at Pearson and has been flown to honor military veterans. The aircraft is of a type used as a pilot training aircraft during World War II.

McKibbin, 69, has lived in Clark County since 1969. He taught contemporary world problems at Columbia River High School and was active in Democratic politics before winning a 49th District legislative seat in 1974. After serving two terms in the House, he was elected as a county commissioner in 1978, receiving nearly 71 percent of the vote. He left elected office in 1990 to work in real estate, and also serve in numerous volunteer and leadership capacities for local organizations, including the Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce, Leadership Clark County and Habitat for Humanity.

He has been married to Nancy McKibbin for more than 40 years.

McKibbin was known for his dedication in all areas of his life, whether working as a teacher, elected official or community member.

“John has always had a really good work ethic, a wonderful way of communicating with people and has been highly respected by people he’s worked with,” said Jean Ryland, a neighbor of McKibbin’s since the late 1980s. “He’s going to be sorely missed by not only those who knew him well as a friend and loved him, but also by people who knew him in the work setting, because he was a kind and caring and respectful individual.”

Ryland said a group of neighbors would meet regularly for dinners, as well as on Christmas Eve and sometimes for brunch on Christmas Day.

“One of the things that always struck me about John was he was very caring and had a very good sense of humor,” she said.

Ryland also said the McKibbins were very close, and even after his two daughters grew up and moved away, they would come back regularly to visit, especially once they had grandchildren to bring along on the trip.

Reaction also started coming in Thursday morning from other prominent Vancouver residents. Vancouver City Council Anne McEnerny-Ogle tweeted: “John had a passion for his work not only in the classroom, but in Vancouver, in Clark County and the state.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.columbian.com

John McKibbin, photo courtesy of Identity Clark County.

VANCOUVER, Wa.– The U.S. Coast Guard dispatched aircraft at first light this morning.  It picked up where it left off Wednesday searching in waters near Astoria after reports of a plane crash into the water near the Astoria-Megler Bridge.  The FAA released limited information this morning , ” We have a missing airplane that was reported last night around 8:30,”said, Allen Kenitzer, spokesman.  “The aircraft was out of Pearson Field/Vancouver and had two people onboard.The Clatsop County Sheriff’s office is assisting with the search.


FM News 101 KXL has learned the pilot of the plane is  John McKibbin.  He was flying a 1942 AT 6 Texas Trainer used during World War II.  McKibbin is well known to the airfield and Clark county community. He was a county commissioner and a state representative.  He has donated lots of hours to the school for the blind and to children eager to learn about planes.  The Clatsop county Sheriff’s department  confirms John was on the plane.  The second person is a woman named Irene Mustang.  The pair were going to spread Irene’s husband’s ashes when the plane went down.


The yellow pin indicates where a plane was believed to have crashed into the Columbia River Wednesday afternoon.


ASTORIA, Ore. — The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for a plane after getting reports it have crashed into the Columbia River near Astoria.

The plane belongs to amateur pilot and former Clark County commissioner John McKibbin, the Clatsop County Sheriff said.

Coast guard officials received reports around around 3:50 p.m. of a private plane crashing in the Columbia River near the Astoria-Megler Bridge, according to our news partners at The Columbian. The aircraft had two people aboard when it left Pearson Field in Vancouver, the FAA said.

The Coast Guard located some oil spots but ultimately suspended the search Wednesday night, tweeting around 9:30 p.m. it remains "open but suspended due to poor visibility, will resume at first light."

Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said there are very small windows to search for the plane due to the tide and strong currents in the area.

McKibbin, 69, was last seen leaving Pearson Field around 3:30 p.m. yesterday, KATU News learned from George Welsh, one of McKibbin's good friends. Welsh said he worked with John to rebuild the North American T-6 Texan that he took up that afternoon.

McKibbin was flying a woman out to spread the ashes of her late husband,Sheriff Bergin said.

http://katu.com



ASTORIA, Ore. -- A former Washington state representative was flying to the coast with a woman who wanted to spread her husband's ashes when the plane crashed, according to the Clatsop County Sheriff's office.

Crews are still searching for the plane that witnesses say crashed near Astoria Wednesday. The captain of a cargo ship reported seeing the plane crash into the Columbia River, near Pier 39, at about 4 p.m.

Clatsop County and a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter crew started an immediate search Wednesday and resumed it at about 7 a.m. Thursday. 

The pilot of the missing plane is former legislator John McKibbin. His passenger was not immediately identified, but was reportedly headed to the coast to spread her husband's ashes.

A friend of McKibbin's, Stephen Kelley, told KGW he saw the plane leave Vancouver Wednesday.

“Last time I saw John, he was in the plane, starting the engine, as I was arriving at Pearson Field somewhere between two and three o’clock in the afternoon on Wednesday,” Kelley said. 

“The airplane took off fine, and all looked fine. But I had noticed he had not returned that evening, when I left the field around 6," Kelley added. "I was a little – not concerned – but I figured he was going for an overnighter. Then I received notification later in the evening that it was his airplane that had crashed in the water. In the river.”

McKibbin is also a former Clark County commissioner and is listed as the current president of the nonprofit business group Identity Clark County. ICC describes him as a real estate investor and active community citizen who was founding chair of the group more than 20 years ago.

A witness in the area told KGW there was plane fuel in the water. Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said they saw a small amount of oil but could not determine the source. Debris was not found.

The Coast Guard said the plane was a silver body, red tail, World War II training craf. 

Story, video and photo:  http://www.kgw.com





Authorities are searching for a private plane from Vancouver, Washington, that crashed into the Columbia River off Pier 39 in Astoria late Wednesday afternoon. 

A 69-year-old Clark County man, John McKibbin — a former Clark County commissioner and an amateur pilot — is believed to have been on board with a woman. They had planned to scatter the ashes of the woman’s husband over the river, The Columbian reported.

McKibbin was last seen about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, when he and the woman took off from Pearson Field in Vancouver, headed for the mouth of the Columbia River, The Columbian reported.




“A very proficient pilot, but it looks like we might have had an unfortunate circumstance,” Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin said.

Bergin confirmed that the search was for a man and a woman, but did not release their identities.

Eyewitnesses reported that the plane — a 1941 North American military trainer with a polished aluminum body, a red nose and tail, and a 40-foot wingspan — went into the river at roughly 4 p.m. Wednesday.




The U.S. Coast Guard performed a first-light search Thursday morning, and the Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office is scheduled to send a dive team into the water at noon.

The agencies scanned the area for approximately three hours on Wednesday. Though rescue teams did not find the aircraft, “we did find lots of oil dots yesterday coming up from the surface,” Bergin said.

Original article can be found here:    hhhtp://www.dailyastorian.com



The U.S. Coast Guard dispatched aircraft at first light Thursday morning to continue searching the waters near Astoria after reports of a plane crash Wednesday night.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Norcross, a Coast Guard spokeswoman, said the effort should take several hours to complete before any findings are reported.

The Federal Aviation Administration released limited information Thursday morning.

"We have a missing airplane that was reported last night around 8:30 p.m.," said Allen Kenitzer, spokesman. "The aircraft was out of Pearson Field/Vancouver and had two people onboard."

The Columbian reported at 8:46 a.m. that former Clark County Commissioner John McKibbin, who is known to be an amateur pilot, has been reported missing.

According to a friend of McKibbin, the former commissioner was last seen at 3:30 p.m. after he left with a woman from Pearson Field in a silver North American AT-6 aircraft with red on its nose.

Norcross said the Clatsop County Sheriff's Office was assisting with the search. A spokesperson with the sheriff's office could not be immediately reached.

Search and rescue crews suspended an initial search about 9:15 p.m. Wednesday because of poor visibility, according to a Tweet from the Coast Guard. Official had received reports from nearby boats but have located no debris, according to TV news reports.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.oregonlive.com

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