Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N84580: Fatal accident occurred in in Ellsworth, Nebraska

http://registry.faa.gov/N84580

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Lincoln FSDO-65


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA130
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 20, 2016 in Ellsworth, NE
Aircraft: AERONCA 7AC, registration: N84580
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 20, 2016, about 1110 mountain daylight time, an Aeronca 7AC airplane, N84580, impacted terrain near Ellsworth, Nebraska. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which departed from the Alliance Municipal Airport (AIA), Alliance, Nebraska without a flight plan.

At 1000, an airport surveillance camera captured the accident airplane depart from AIA. About 1100, the pilot's brother observed the accident airplane maneuvering near his home, which was located in a rural area about 31 miles northeast of AIA. The airplane was subsequently located on March 22, 2016, about 4 miles southwest of this home.

The airplane impacted into rolling terrain on a southeasterly heading. The main wreckage came to rest upright on a northwesterly heading, about 340 feet from the initial impact point. The left and right wings separated from the fuselage, with the front and rear wood spars of both wings fractured near the wing root. The right wing was about 210 feet northwest of the main wreckage and the left wing was about 20 feet to the northwest of the main wreckage. The propeller separated from the engine and came to rest about 180 feet northwest of the main wreckage.

At 1053, the weather observation station at AIA, located about 27 miles southwest of the accident site, reported the following conditions: wind variable at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 6 degrees C, dew point minus 12 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.23 inches of mercury.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



An Alliance man has been confirmed as the single fatality in an airplane accident in Sheridan County.

Sheridan County Attorney Jamian Simmons said autopsy results on Ben Andrick, 68, of Alliance, are still pending, as is the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation into the wreck.

Andrick went missing March 20 after leaving the Alliance Airport around 8:30 a.m. His family reported him missing when he failed to return, contacting the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and posting information on Facebook. Andrick was flying his own Aeronca fixed wing single-engine two-seater.

The Civil Air Patrol began a search Monday, focusing on an area northeast of Alliance, and continued the efforts Tuesday. The Sheridan County Sheriff’s Office and the Nebraska State Patrol responded to the scene and confirmed it was Andrick’s plane. The wreckage was located seven miles northeast of Ellsworth in Sheridan County, approximately 30 miles from Alliance.

Andrick was a registered nurse at Box Butte General Hospital, according to a Facebook post by the hospital’s CEO Dan Griess.

“The Box Butte General Hospital family is greatly saddened by the loss of our friend and colleague, Ben Andrick. Our prayers are with his family and friends during this most difficult time. Ben will be missed by the entire staff at BBGH, where he had been employed for over 15 years,” Griess posted.

Dozens of comments on the post called Andrick and excellent nurse with a good sense of humor.

Andrick’s was the second fatal airplane crash in the northern Panhandle recently. John Prickett of Double Oak, Texas, crashed near Chadron last October.


http://rapidcityjournal.com

A missing pilot died this week in a plane crash in Sheridan County.

Family members of Ben Andrick, of Alliance, had been posting via social media since March 21, the day after Andrick had flown in a two-seater airplane over Ellsworth, Nebraska. Andrick had last been seen the morning of Sunday, March 20, taking off in good flying weather from the Alliance airport.

Members of the Civil Air Patrol and Nebraska State Patrol reportedly looked for the man and his airplane. Family members also reported that an a member of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center was able to successfully ping Andrick’s cell phone in attempts to locate him. The man also was reported to have frequently flown in the Alliance area so the searches were focused in Box Butte and Sheridan Counties.

On Tuesday, wreckage was located about 7 miles northeast of Ellsworth. Family members have confirmed on social media that Andrick died in the crash.

The Sheridan County Attorney’s Office and Nebraska State Patrol responded to the location. 

A spokesperson with the Sheridan County Attorney's Office said that no details about the cause of the crash or Andrick's death are known. An autopsy will be performed and the FAA will conduct its own investigation. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.starherald.com

ALLIANCE - The Nebraska Civil Air Patrol has found the wreckage of a small plane in southern Sheridan County  believed to be one missing since Sunday on a flight around the Alliance area. 


CAP Major Tom Pflug says the search for  Ben Andrick and his small single-engine 2-seat plane was in its second day when a pilot at the Alliance airport report late Tuesday morning that he'd spotted wreckage in a field about 7 miles north Ellsworth.

Major Pflug says his group then flew over the site and notified the Nebraska State Patrol and Sheridan County Sheriff's office, who both responded to the location. Neither has released any information at this time and Pflug said early Tuesday evening he couldn't release anything, either.

Andrick was last seen Sunday morning at 8:30 taking off in perfect flying weather from the Alliance airport. Family members contacted the Alliance police when he didn't return and the police notified the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.   

Major Pflug says the family told authorities Andrick had a habit of taking a short flight over a ranch northeast of Alliance and returning, so the search was focused in that area. 

The CAP had 3 planes in the air Tuesday morning, using forensic information from Andrick's cell phone to try to track his route and set up grid searches.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.chadrad.com

NTSB Identification: DEN06LA003
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Saturday, October 08, 2005 in Berthoud, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/28/2006
Aircraft: Aeronca 7AC, registration: N84580
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Continental C-65 engine had been removed, and the airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-235-C1 engine, rated at 115 horsepower at 2,600 rpm. According to the pilot, he filled his fuel tanks (13 gallons each wing) and took off. He made four touch-and-go landings at his private airstrip, then flew north "to see the aspens." On the return leg, the engine "sputtered." He enriched the mixture and the engine ran smoothly. Shortly thereafter, the engine sputtered again. The fuel gauges indicated between 1/4 and 1/2 full. He rocked the wings and the engine ran smoothly again. Finally, after flying for 2-1/2 hours, the engine completely lost power. Unable to reach his airstrip, the pilot elected to land on a county road. The airplane struck telephone wires and a steel post alongside the road, tearing off the left wing. The pilot told a sheriff's deputy that he ran out of fuel. According to the salvage crew that retrieved the airplane, they drained 2-1/2 gallons of fuel from the right tank. The pilot said there should have been another 2-1/2 gallons of fuel in the left tank. The engine was later functionally tested to full power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
the pilot's improper in-flight decision making which resulted in loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing factors are the transmission wires and the metal pole.

On October 8, 2005, approximately 1920 mountain daylight time, an Aeronca 7AC, N84580, operated and piloted by a private pilot, was destroyed when it struck telephone lines and impacted terrain following a loss of engine power near Berthoud, Colorado. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91 without a flight plan. The pilot sustained no injuries. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Berthoud approximately 1700.

The Continental C-65 engine had been removed, and the airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-235-C1 engine, rated at 115 horsepower at 2,600 rpm. According to the pilot, he filled his fuel tanks (13 gallons each wing) and took off. He made four touch-and-go landings at his airstrip, then flew north to the Laramie, Wyoming, area "to see the aspens." On his return leg as he approached the Red Feathers Lakes area, the engine "sputtered." He enriched the mixture and the engine ran smoothly. As he approached Longmont, Colorado, the engine sputtered again. He said the fuel gauges indicated between 1/4 and 1/2 full. He rocked the wings and the engine ran smoothly again. As he approached Berthoud, the engine lost power. The pilot said he had been aloft for 2-1/2 hours. Unable to reach his airstrip, the pilot elected to land on Road 23E, just south of Road 4 in Larimer County. The airplane struck telephone wires and a steel post alongside the road, tearing off the left wing. The pilot told a Larimer County sheriff's deputy that he ran out of fuel. According to the salvage crew that retrieved the airplane, they drained 2-1/2 gallons of fuel from the right tank. The pilot said there should have been another 2-1/2 gallons of fuel in the left tank.

On November 17, 2005, the engine (s/n 2024-15) was functionally tested at the facilities of Beegles Aircraft Service in Greeley, Colorado. Prior to the test, it was noted that the gascolator was empty. A maximum of 2,200 rpm was achieved, and there was a 75 rpm drop when each magneto was tested. Fuel flowed normally from the forward wing supply line, but would not flow from the aft supply line. Examination disclosed that the aft supply line was pinched inside the fuselage in an area of impact damage.

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