Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Vans RV-6A, N419B: Fatal accident occurred March 01, 2016 near Elmdale Airpark (82TS), Abilene, Taylor County, Texas and accident occurred September 01, 2014 in Marshalltown, Iowa

http://registry.faa.gov/N419B

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA114
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 01, 2016 in Abilene, TX
Aircraft: OHLGREN RV 6A, registration: N419B
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 1, 2016, about 0830 central standard time, an experimental amateur-built Ohlgren RV 6A airplane, N419B, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 35 at the Elmdale Airpark (82TS), near Abilene, Texas. The airline transport pilot and his passenger were fatally injured. The impact with terrain destroyed the airplane. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on flight plan. The flight was destined for Henderson, Nevada, and was originating from 82TS at the time of the accident.

A witness at 82TS witnessed the takeoff. The witness picked the pilot and passenger up at a local hotel and brought them to 82TS. The pilot checked weather and preflighted the aircraft. According to the witness, the airplane taxied to the threshold of runway 35 and the pilot performed an engine run-up, which sounded normal. The airport windsock indicated winds from the north-northwest. After takeoff the airplane drifted slightly right (east) in a wings level climbing attitude. A turn to the west with a bank angle of more than 30 degrees began and the aircraft nose pitched up followed by an immediate nose down spin to the left. The aircraft then was out of sight due to a rise in terrain. The witness and another airport tenant drove to the site and observed that the accident airplane impacted terrain. A witness subsequently called 911.

The 63-year old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airline transport pilot certificate with a multi-engine rating. He held commercial pilot privileges for single-engine land airplanes. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate dated February 16, 2016. The medical certificate had a limitation that the pilot must have glasses available for near vision.

N419B was an amateur-built experimental airplane constructed from a Van's Aircraft Inc. RV 6A kit, which was completed in 2001 and it had its special airworthiness certificate issued on August 4, 2001. The airplane was a single engine, low-wing monoplane, configured to seat two occupants in a side-by-side seating arrangement. It employed a tricycle landing gear arrangement and was constructed primarily from aluminum alloy materials. The airplane was powered by a 180-horsepower Lycoming O-360-C1G engine with serial number L-31710-36A. The airplane was equipped with a forward opening, tip-up canopy.

The airplane was equipped with a Dynon SkyView SV-D700 display unit. According to the Dynon user's guide, the display can act as a primary flight display with synthetic vision, an engine monitoring system, and a moving map in a variety of customizable screen layouts.

At 0752, the recorded weather at the Abilene Regional Airport, near Abilene, Texas, was: Wind 340 degrees at 12 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point 2 degrees C; altimeter 30.10 inches of mercury.

The accident airport, 82TS, was a privately owned, private-use airport. Two runways, 18/36 and 17 /35 served the airport. Runway 17/35 was a 2,950 by 30 foot asphalt runway. The airport had 100 low lead fuel service.

The airplane came to rest upright about 189 feet and 330 degrees from the departure end of runway 36. The airplanes resting heading was about 360 degrees magnetic. The airplane's propeller and propeller flange separated from its crankshaft. The propeller was found imbedded in the ground about one foot below the surface. When removed the propeller blades exhibited chordwise abrasions and leading edge nicks. The engine mounts and engine cowling were deformed rearward and crushed consistent with the nose of the airplane impacting terrain. The leading edge of both wings exhibited aftward deformation consistent with a nose low impact with terrain. The cockpit canopy was found separated from the fuselage. The canopy's latch was found in the latched position and the latching assembly was deformed consistent with impact damage. The canopy handle was missing from its canopy handle block. The center section of the canopy handle block, which holds the canopy handle, exhibited a vertical tear where the canopy handle was housed. The empennage was attached to the fuselage and wrinkle deformation was observed at the juncture of the two. The left aileron separated from its wing.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage revealed that a liquid consistent with fuel was found in the fuel line routed to the engine driven fuel pump and in the line to the carburetor. The control stick was moved and the attached aileron and elevators moved accordingly. The rod end to the left aileron moved when the control stick was moved. The control cables at the rudder pedals were manipulated by hand and the rudder moved. Flight control continuity was established.

The right magneto was found separated from its accessory pad. Both of the engine's magnetos were removed from the wreckage and their ignition leads cut near their towers. Both magnetos were rotated by hand and sparks were observed at all ignition leads. The engine driven fuel pump sustained impact damage and its base was separated from its body. The engine driven fuel pump produced a suction when its slotted shaft was manipulated with a flat-bladed screwdriver. A liquid consistent with the smell of aviation gasoline subsequently exited the engine driven fuel pump fitting. Sparkplugs were removed. One spark plug was oil fouled and the remaining plugs exhibited a brown color consistent with normal combustion. The carburetor was removed from the intake. The carburetor's mounting base was fractured. The carburetor finger screen was removed and no debris was observed in the screen. The mixture and throttle cables were pulled in the cockpit and motion on the carburetor linkages was accordingly observed. The propeller control in the cockpit was pulled and motion on the governor linkage was accordingly observed. Engine control continuity was established.

The cover over the vacuum accessory pad was removed and a splined adapter tool was inserted in the pump drive base to turn the engine accessory gears. All cylinder rocker covers were removed. The engine produced a thumb compression at all cylinders when the adapter tool was rotated by hand. No rocker or valve movement anomalies were observed when the adapter tool was rotated. Crankshaft and camshaft continuity was established.

The Dynon display was removed from the wreckage and was retained and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Recorder Laboratory to see if it contains recorded data in reference to the accident flight.

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Lubbock FSDO-13

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.






ABILENE, Texas -   Authorities have identified two men who died in a plane crash at Elmdale Airpark earlier this week.

Killed were pilot James Estol Hathcock, 63, of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and passenger  Aaron T. Taylor,  33, also of Eureka Springs.

According to the Department of Public Safety, the single-engine, Vans RV-6 experimental aircraft crashed while departing from Elmdale Airpark about 8:50 a.m. Tuesday.

"After (the) plane took off, it banked  towards the west and went down near the end of the runway," a DPS news release said Thursday.

The National Transportation Safety Board is in charge of the investigation. DPS referred any additional questions to the NTSB and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Previous story:

Two people were killed in a plane crash Tuesday morning at Elmdale Airpark in Taylor County, Sheriff Ricky Bishop said.

The crash occurred about 8:50 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The two victims aren't from Abilene or the Big Country, Bishop said.

“The aircraft exploded on impact,” FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said, referring to preliminary reports.

According to the last time it was registered with the FAA, the plane was owned by Floyd Halderman Jr. of Eldon, Missouri. The same plane was involved in a September 2014 crash in Iowa.

Witnesses told Elmdale Airpark officials that it appeared the plane stalled during takeoff from the airport and went down on the north end of the runway.

“Preliminary information indicates a single engine Vans RV-6 Experimental aircraft with two people on board crashed … while departing from Elmdale Airpark in Abilene,” Lunsford said.

“FAA investigators are on their way, and the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) has been notified.”

The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation, Lunsford said.

Clyde, Baird and Eula fire departments were immediately called to the scene.

















http://registry.faa.gov/N419B 


NTSB Identification: CEN14LA472
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 01, 2014 in Marshalltown, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/11/2015
Aircraft: OHLGREN BRENT E RV-6A, registration: N419B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said he visually checked and verified that the right wing fuel tank was just under half full and that the left wing fuel tank was just over half full prior to takeoff. As the airplane approached the destination, about 190 nm from the departure airport, the pilot decided to conduct a practice visual approach. Shortly after turning onto final approach, the engine lost power. After employing emergency procedures, the pilot was able to restore power and climbed the airplane to 3,100 feet. He then checked the fuel gauges, which both indicated one-eighth full. The engine then lost power a second time. The pilot made a forced landing in a bean field, and the airplane nosed over. During postaccident examination, no fuel sloshing could be heard when the wings were rocked; both wing fuel caps were then removed from the inverted airplane and no fuel leaked out. The airplane was righted, and when the master switch was turned on, the left fuel gauge was one needle-width above empty and the right fuel gauge indicated empty. The integrity of the fuel tanks appeared to be intact, and no fuel leaked from the tanks. No fuel was visible in either fuel tank. No fuel was recovered when the left and right wing fuel sump drains were removed. After adding fuel, the engine was started and ran at idle power until it was shut down.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion as a result of the pilot's misjudgment of the amount of fuel onboard prior to flight.

On September 1, 2014, about 1740 central standard time, the pilot of an Ohlgren Vans RV-6A, N419B, made a forced landing in a bean field after the engine lost power 5 miles south of the Marshalltown Municipal Airport (MIW), Marshalltown, Iowa,. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Marv Skie-Lincoln County Airport (Y14), Tea, South Dakota, about 1615.

The pilot said that prior to departing Y14, he visually checked and verified that the right wing fuel tank was "just under" half full and the left wing fuel tank was "just over" half full (a half-full tank contains 19 useable gallons). En route, the pilot switched tanks "multiple times." Approaching KMIW, the pilot decided he would practice a visual approach using the RNAV (GPS) RWY 31 instrument approach procedure. Shortly after turning onto final approach at VUNDY IAF (initial approach fix), the engine lost power. After employing emergency procedures, the pilot was able to restore power and climbed to 3,100 feet. He said he checked the fuel gauges and they both indicated 1/8-full. The engine lost power a second time. The pilot made a forced landing in a bean field and the airplane nose over.

On September 2, two airworthiness inspectors and an operations inspector from the Des Moines Flight Standards District Office went to the accident site. They reported the airplane was inverted and the vertical stabilizer and rudder were crushed. The right wing outboard leading edge and tip were crushed. The nose gear was bent. The inspectors rocked the wings rocked back and forth and could not hear any fuel sloshing. Both wing fuel caps were removed and no fuel leaked out.

On September 18, 2014, FAA inspectors returned to the accident site. A recovery crew was at the site and turned the aircraft over so that it was resting on its landing gear. With the master switch on, the left fuel gage was one needle-width above empty and the right fuel gage indicated empty. There was no dead or discolored vegetation around the airplane, and the integrity of the fuel tanks appeared intact. No fuel leaked from the tanks. No fuel was visible in either fuel tank. No fuel was recovered when the left and right wing fuel sump drains were removed.

Fuel was added to the right tank and the engine was started. It ran at an idle power for about 30 seconds before being shut down.

Flight Standards District Office: FAA Des Moines FSDO-61


MARSHALL COUNTY, Iowa —A small aircraft flipped over onto its top during an emergency landing near Marshalltown Monday evening. 

The Marshall County Sheriff’s Office said 31-year-old Jason Stone was en route from Sioux Falls, South Dakota to the Marshalltown Municipal Airport when he experienced engine problems and was forced to land in a soybean field.

Officials were called to the scene around 5:45 p.m.

During the landing, mud from the field caused the front wheel and nose of the single-engine airplane to get stuck in the field. The plane then flipped over.

Stone was the only occupant of the 2001 Vans RV6A plane and was not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to make a follow-up investigation.


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