Saturday, March 12, 2016

Van's RV-8A, N838RV: Fatal accident occurred March 12, 2016 in Clermont, Lake County, Florida

DANE SHEAHEN: http://registry.faa.gov/N838RV


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 12, 2016 in Clermont, FL
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8, registration: N838RV
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Sheahen RV-8A, N838RV, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and the pilot-rated rear-seat passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, at about 0825. The local personal flight, destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

Multiple witnesses in the area of the accident site reported seeing an airplane that was consistent with the accident airplane inflight with a rough running engine sound. One witness stated that the engine was not making any noise as the airplane made a 180 degree turn over a field, and descended out of sight in a nose-low attitude. The airplane was located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to preliminary radar data, the airplane was flying in a southwesterly direction, at approximately 2,220 feet mean sea level, when it began a climbing left turn, and reached an altitude of about 2,600 feet (msl). The last few targets showed a rapidly decreasing airspeed. A nearby flight of three airplanes reported hearing the pilot of an "RV airplane" make a mayday distress radio call, reporting that he had "lost his engine" around the time of the accident.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage came to rest in an open field about 307 feet elevation. The wreckage path was 30 feet long, from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage, which came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of about 110 degrees. The right wing, aileron and flap were intact and attached to the main spar at the fuselage. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the left wing. The left wing tip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer was attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open, the canopy was separated and laying over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. The fuel tank was fragmented and no residual fuel was observed, the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. Initial examination of the engine revealed metal debris in the oil sump finger screen. The engine was retained for further examination to be performed at a later date.

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, was assembled from a kit and issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to FAA records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on January 19, 2011, and he reported 880 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Weather at Orlando Municipal Airport (ORL), about 19 miles east of the accident site, reported at the time of the accident included clear skies, 10 statute miles of visibility and winds from 130 degrees at 9 knots.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




A Volusia County pilot was among two people who died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital in Clermont.

Dane Sheahen, who lived in the Spruce Creek Fly-In, was piloting the plane when it crashed, according to Clermont police. His passenger was James Kos, of Canute, Oklahoma. Both were licensed pilots.

The field where the crash occurred is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

The crash happened about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane .... appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don't know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We're very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.news-journalonline.com




CLERMONT — Two people died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital.

The field is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

Police had not released the names as of Saturday evening.

The crash happened at about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane, who are not identified, appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don’t know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We’re very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dailycommercial.com



A single-engine plane crash Saturday morning in a Clermont field left the two people on board dead, officials said.

The pilot, Dane Sheahen of Port Orange, and passenger, James Kos of Canute, Okla., were pronounced dead at the scene of the crash. Both were licensed pilots, police said.

The two-seater aircraft crashed about 8:45 a.m. in a field between South Lake Hospital and a subdivision, landing about 100 yards from nearby homes.

Witness Mark Wells was in his front yard when he heard the plane crash.

"My initial thought was that it was a car passing and backfired," said Wells, who lives just behind the scene of the crash. "I came around [the house] and a neighbor was calling the police."

Wells ran to the aircraft to see if he could help, but it was too late.

"I get out there and I can see the guy laying out but still in the cockpit," Wells said. "I was going to say 'Are you OK?' but then I got just close enough to see he was gone."

Wells said it wasn't until later that he realized there was a second victim in the plane.

Sheahen and Kos are believed to have died on impact, Clermont police Capt. Michael McMaster said. Medical examiners removed their bodies from the scene about 2 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal and Aviation Administration will investigate the crash and determine a cause, City of Clermont spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said. Clermont police are assisting in the investigation.

Police said it's unclear where the aircraft was coming from or where it was headed. They also did not know what type of plane it was.

Bloodsworth said the plane was possibly headed west when it crashed.

The plane's propellers appear to be undamaged, though the body and tail of the aircraft were crumpled.

Bloodsworth said officials anticipate staying overnight to secure the scene, as the aircraft likely won't be removed until Sunday.

The field where the plane crashed is near Citrus Tower Boulevard and Oakley Seaver Drive, between a subdivision and South Lake Hospital.

No other people were injured and no buildings were damaged in the crash, officials said.

Wells said he is glad the pilot seemingly attempted not to strike any homes in the neighborhood.

"I'm thankful he sacrificed trying to do the right thing," Wells said. "My thoughts are with him."

Story, photo gallery and video:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com














No comments: