Saturday, March 19, 2016

Cessna 210L Centurion, M & L Aeronautics LLC, N59196: Accident occurred March 19, 2016 at Myrtle Beach International Airport (KMYR), Horry County, South Carolina

M & L AERONAUTICAL LLC: http://registry.faa.govN59196

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA135
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 19, 2016 in Myrtle Beach, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA 210L, registration: N59196
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 19, 2016, at 1050 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 210L, N59196, sustained substantial damage when the main landing gear collapsed during a precautionary landing at the Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The private pilot and the two passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to a private corporation and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at MYR at 1001 and was destined for Hilton Head Island Airport (HXD), Hilton Head, South Carolina.

The pilot stated that he performed a thorough preflight inspection and engine run-up utilizing the appropriate checklists before he departed and everything was normal. About 10 minutes after takeoff, with the landing gear and flaps fully retracted, the pilot noticed the airplane began to lose electrical power and contacted air traffic control to let them know he wanted to return to MYR. The pilot said he was cleared to return and shortly after he lost all electrical power. The adult passenger then called the control tower via a cell phone and was cleared to land. The landing gear, which is extended and retracted by hydraulic actuators powered by an electrically-driven hydraulic power pack, was disabled due to the electrical failure, so the pilot had to manually pump the gear down via the emergency gear-extension handle. The pilot said he attempted to pump the landing gear down, but the main landing gear would not fully extend. Only the nose wheel extended to what appeared to be the fully down and locked position.

The pilot said it would normally require about 45-47 pumps of the emergency gear extension handle to fully extend the landing gear; however, after about 10 pumps, it felt as if there was no hydraulic pressure in the system and it "didn't seem normal." The pilot tried to pump the gear down for about 20 minutes before realizing he would have to land with unlocked landing gear. The pilot said the landing was smooth and the main landing gear held the support of the airplane for a while before they collapsed and the rear of the airplane bounced on the ground. The airplane skidded to a stop resulting in substantial damage to the left horizontal stabilizer. The belly of the fuselage, main landing gear, and left wing tip were also damaged. According to first responders, the left wing was leaking fuel and there was a small hydraulic leak coming from about 1-foot behind the nose wheel.

A postaccident examination of the engine by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed the electrical failure was due to the alternator's primary wire being corroded and broken off of the terminal. A review of the maintenance logbooks revealed the last annual was completed in March 2015, at an engine total time of 1,015.5 hours. There were no entries that the alternator had been repaired in the last 12 months and the pilot reported no mechanical issues prior to the accident flight.

A mechanic, who was on scene shortly after the landing and had recovered the airplane, stated that one of the main landing gear actuators had sustained impact damage and was leaking a small amount of hydraulic fluid. He did not observe any mechanical issues with the landing gear system other than the damaged actuator. The airplane's last annual inspection was completed in March 2015, at an airframe total time of 4,103.2 hours. There was a maintenance entry on November 12, 2015, for the hydraulic system accumulator and right main gear door actuator, which were removed and repaired. The landing gear was tested after the repair and a leak check was performed. The pilot said there were no issues with the landing gear hydraulics after the work was performed. He also stated that he did not test the emergency gear extension system after this repair and had not practiced any manual gear extensions in the airplane in several years.

According to the airplane's pilot operating handbook, page 7-11, LANDING GEAR SYSTEM, "Hydraulic system fluid level may be checked by utilizing the dipstick/filler cap, on the power pack, behind a snap-out cover panel on the right side of the control pedestal. The system should be checked at 25-hour intervals. If the fluid level is at or below the ADD line on the dipstick, hydraulic fluid should be added." According to the FAA inspector, who checked the hydraulic fluid level several days after the accident, noted it was at the ADD level. The pilot stated that he did not check hydraulic fluid level before the accident flight but did check it the day before and the level was "ok." 

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land, instrument airplane. His last FAA third-class medical was issued on March 15, 2016. The pilot reported a total of 1,149 total hours, of which, 327 hours were in the accident airplane.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA135 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 19, 2016 in Myrtle Beach, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA 210L, registration: N59196
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 19, 2016, at 1020 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 210L, N59196, sustained substantial damage when the main landing gear collapsed during a precautionary landing at the Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The private pilot and the two passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to a private corporation and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at MYR at 1001 and was destined for Hilton Head Island airport (HXD), Hilton Head, South Carolina.

The pilot stated that he performed a thorough preflight inspection and engine run-up utilizing the appropriate checklists before he departed and everything was normal. About 10 minutes after takeoff, with the landing gear and flaps fully retracted, the pilot noticed that he began to lose electrical power and contacted air traffic control to let them know that he had an alternator failure and wanted to return to MYR. The pilot said he was cleared to return to MYR and shortly after he turned back to the airport, he lost all electrical power. The adult passenger called the control tower via a cell phone, who in turn, cleared him to land. The pilot said he attempted to pump the landing gear down with the emergency gear extension handle, but the main landing gear would not fully extend. Only the nose wheel extended to what appeared to be the fully down and locked position.

The pilot further described that it typically requred about 45-47 pumps of the emergency gear extension handle to move the gear into the down and locked position; however during the accident flight, after about 10 pumps he could sense there was no hydraulic pressure in the system and it "didn't seem normal." The pilot continued to try and pump the gear down for about 20 minutes before he realized that the main gear was not going to extend and he would have to land with unsecure landing gear. The pilot said that the landing was very smooth and the main landing gear held the support of the airplane for a while before they both collapsed. The airplane skidded to a stop resulting in substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. The belly of the fuselage was also damaged and there was no damage to the propeller blades.

The airplane was retained for further examination.



MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WBTW) A small aircraft made an emergency landing at the Myrtle Beach International Airport on Saturday.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Cessna C210 aircraft made an emergency landing on runway 18/36 around 10:50 a.m. Saturday. 

The aircraft had departed MYR and was headed to Hilton Head Island, but turned around when it experienced a problem with it’s alternator. 

The plane’s landing gear collapsed as it landed back at MYR.

Airport Spokesman Kirk Lovell said three people were on board when the plane landed and they all deplaned. Their current conditions are unknown.

Lovell said the FAA gave the approval for the plane to be removed from the runway.

No takeoffs or landings were allowed while the plane was on the runway. 

Three flights were diverted, one to Wilmington International Airport, and two to Charleston International Airport. 

At least two flights were delayed from leaving MYR.

The airport is back on a normal schedule as of 1:45 PM Saturday.

Original article can be found here: http://wbtw.com


A small aircraft made an emergency landing at the Myrtle Beach International Airport Saturday morning after the plane lost electrical power, Lt. Christian Sliker with Myrtle Beach Fire Rescue said.

At about 10:30 a.m. the plane was about two mile from the MYR when it lost power and had to make an emergency landing and had to do so without its landing gear properly extended, officials said.

EMS crews were on standby awaiting the plane’s arrival, and one Horry County Fire Rescue ambulance was on scene, along with jetport rescue crews.

No information has been provided about who how many people were on board or if there were injuries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com




Myrtle Beach Fire Rescue Lt. Christian Sliker said a small aircraft had lost all electrical power a few miles out from Myrtle Beach International Airport Saturday morning. He said it landed just before 11:00 a.m. without the landing gear fully extended.

As of 10:28 a.m. the plane was about two miles out from the airport and had lost all electrical power and was attempting to land at MYR. Sliker said it is not a commercial airplane.

Emergency crews were on standby awaiting the plane's arrival. Sliker said after it landed the incident was handled by jetport fire rescue. There is no word on how many people were on board.

Flights in to Myrtle Beach International Airport were being diverted Saturday morning after the crash. No flights were allowed to leave MYR as of 11:40 a.m.

Original article can be found here: http://wpde.com

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