Thursday, March 10, 2016

Small plane crashes lead to questions about safety



BRYAN, Texas- The Brazos Valley has had three plane crashes all within 30 days. The amount of crashes in such a short period of time could cause many people to wonder how safe it is to fly these small planes.

"I don't think I've seen three plane crashes in a thirty day period, that's the first in my experience. It's not something you see everyday," says Trooper Morgan from the Dept. of Public Safety. 




Jacob Shaw has a private pilots license and has been flying planes for six years.

"Flying a plane is not inherently dangerous but it is incredibly unforgiving of any mistakes," says Shaw. 

 Shaw is a member of the Texas Flying Club. He says safety is something the group of around 70 pilots regularly discuss.

"The second you stop learning, you become a danger to yourself and everyone else," says Shaw. 




A big part of safety is pre-flight planning. Knowing where all the airports are in between each flight destinations and keeping a lookout for weather. Shaw saws a plane is supposed to get inspected by a mechanic every year but before a flight a pilot should manually check their amount of fuel and check its quality.

"Pilots who fly once of twice a month, their experience is enough to get up in the air and enough to do it right but not necessarily enough where they can't get it wrong," says Shaw. 




Shaw says pilots need to be honest and ask themselves if their experience and proficiency are adequate before they take off. The federal aviation regulation requires a minimum of forty hours flight time to get a private pilots license.  The Texas Flying Club does have instructor who assist their club members.

The NTSB is still investigating the cause of all three plane crashes.

Story and video: http://kagstv.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA111 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 28, 2016 in Navasota, TX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N477TC
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 28, 2016, about 0850 central standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N477TC, collided with the terrain following a loss of control in Navasota, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot/certificated flight instructor and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Air Akhtar Heating & Air Conditioning LLC and was operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the David Wayne Hook Airport (DWH), Spring, Texas, at 0817.

The last air traffic control contact with the airplane was at 0821, shortly after its departure from DWH. A still photo from a security camera at the Navasota Municipal Airport (60R), an uncontrolled airport, showed the airplane heading north on the taxiway at 0847. A pilot, who was practicing touch and go landings at 60R, reported seeing the wreckage southeast of the airport around 0900. He subsequently reported the accident to local authorities. This pilot stated he did not hear or see the accident airplane in the area prior to seeing the wreckage, but that he had been in the area only long enough to have performed two touch and go landings. Runway 17 was being used for takeoffs and landings at 60R at the time of the accident.
  
NTSB Identification: CEN16LA121
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 04, 2016 in Normangee, TX
Aircraft: ARIOSTO JAMES J ARIOSTO MUSTANG II, registration: N12JA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 4, 2016, at 1230 central standard time, an Ariosto Mustang II experimental airplane, N12JA, impacted terrain following a reported loss of engine power near Normangee, Texas. The private pilot sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed at an unknown time.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, examination of the accident revealed the airplane impacted terrain in a left wing, nose low attitude. The airplane came to rest upright in a field that was surrounded by trees. The engine and firewall were separated from the fuselage. The left wing fuel tank was compromised and right wing fuel tank contained an unknown amount of fuel. One propeller blade remained attached to the hub and no damage was noted, and one propeller blade was separated near the hub.

The pilot sustained serious injuries and was airlifted to the hospital from the accident site. 


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA107
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 16, 2016 in Benchley, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N732FU
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 16, 2016, at 1130 central standard time, a Cessna P210N, N732FU, collided with trees and the terrain during a forced landing in Bryan, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The private pilot received minor injuries. One passenger received serious injuries and a second passenger was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to BIA Air LLC, and was being operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight which operated on a VFR flight plan. The flight originated from the Arlington Municipal Airport (GKY), Arlington, Texas, about 1100.

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