Thursday, May 12, 2016

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N1114A, Flanagan Enterprises (Nevada) Inc: Accident occurred May 12, 2016 near Lodi Airport (1O3), San Joaquin County, California

Flanagan Enterprises (Nevada) Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1114A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA107
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 12, 2016 in Acampo, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration: N1114A
Injuries: 1 Minor, 17 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 12, 2016, about 1413 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 208B, N1114A, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Acampo, California. The airplane was registered to Flanagan Enterprises (Nevada) INC., and operated by the Parachute Center under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries and his 17 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight originated about 1 minute prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that following takeoff from runway 26, he made a right turn and continued his climb for the skydive drop, however, while passing through 1,000 feet above ground level (agl), the engine lost power. The pilot initiated a turn toward the airport, however, realized he was unable to make it, and landed in an open field. During the landing roll, the airplane exited the field, crossed a road, impacted a truck, continued into a vineyard, and nosed over.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the fuselage and left wing were structurally damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.




Sebastian Alvarez was on board a skydiving plane that crashed Thursday in San Joaquin County.





ACAMPO, Calif. (KCRA) —One of the survivors of a skydiving plane crash on Thursday near Acampo said he was stunned that all 18 people on board were able to walk away.

"It was so unreal. It was, like, wow! Better than a movie," said Sebastian Alvarez.

Alavarez said he was seated next to the pilot, as the single engine Cessna took off from the Lodi Airport.

He said the plane's engine appeared to lose power shortly after takeoff.

"We all knew that we were going down," he said.

Alvarez watched through the windshield as the plane touched down in a hay field, rolled across a road and under some power lines, then clipped a grape vine wire in a vineyard and flipped over.

"I waited for the impact. I stopped looking and clunk, the impact. So I feel the pah-pah," he said.

As the passengers and the pilot hung upside down in their seat belts, they worried the worst might be yet to come.

"I knew that if he can put the plane in the ground, then we have the second big chance is the fire that can kill us," he said.

But there was no fire.

All the people on board were able to climb out safely.

The only reported injury was the pilot's bloody nose.

"When you get out of the plane and you see people, all of them walking and talking and alive, conscious, and then you look at the plane, it's like, 'Did this just happen?' I should be dead, or I should be burned, or I should be broken," he said.

The plane's wreckage remained in the vineyard off Jahant Road on Friday.

Passersby stopped to take pictures and marvel at the passengers' luck.

Jack Gladish said he knows the pilot, whom he identified as Greg.

He said he was amazed the pilot was able to control the plane as much as he did with only the wheel brakes to slow it.

"Since the engine failed, he didn't have reverse on his prop. The (propeller) can go backwards and stop him. He didn't have that. So he was along for the ride," Gladish said.

Ian Flanagan, president of Flanagan Enterprises, confirmed his company owns the plane but said Parachute Center skydiving school is responsible for the maintenance.

Bill Dawes, owner of the skydiving school, said he is confident the plane's service history is up to date.

"There's no issue as far as the paperwork is concerned. There's no issue as far as the airplane is concerned. The issue is why it stopped running," he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is expected to investigate the cause of the crash.


Original article can be found here: http://www.kcra.com





Dramatic video from onboard a small plane as it made an emergency landing near Lodi. 

The plane had 17 skydivers onboard, and fortunately, none were injured in the crash.

The video shows how moments after takeoff, there appears to be a problem. The plane had to make an emergency landing, ended up clipping a truck and flipped over.

See video:  http://www.abc10.com



Federal investigators are looking into the crash of a tightly packed skydiving plane carrying 18 people that landed upside down in an Acampo vineyard on Thursday – a review that likely will include a look at maintenance records and weight and balance calculations on the plane.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Keith Holloway said Friday that the operator of the airplane is responsible for removing the damaged aircraft from the field to a hanger or other location for inspection.

“The NTSB, along with other parties to the investigation, which may include the FAA and the engine manufacturer, may go to the aircraft’s ultimate re-location for examination,” said Holloway.

No date has been scheduled for NTSB inspection, but Holloway suspects it will happen next week.

“At this point it is under investigation,” said Holloway. “Once we have access to the aircraft, we will conduct the physical examination of the aircraft.”

No passengers were hurt in the crash into the vineyard near the Lodi Parachute Center in San Joaquin County. The pilot suffered a “minor injury,” according to a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. A skydiving center official described the injury as a bloody nose.

The crash occurred about 2 p.m. Thursday in a field just east of Highway 99 between Galt and Lodi.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the plane was a single-engine Cessna 208. The plane experienced engine trouble right after takeoff. The pilot tried to return to the airport but clipped a vehicle on approach, spokesman Ian Gregor wrote in an email.

The FAA cannot provide details until the NTSB concludes its work and releases its findings. However, FAA officials say they and the NTSB look at whether the pilot was qualified to fly a particular aircraft, the pilot’s medical record, weather conditions, the maintenance log of the aircraft and weight and balance calculations.

The plane, a single-engine, turbo-prop Cessna 208B, typically has up to 14 seats, according to a description of the craft on the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association website and other aviation sites. FAA officials did not respond to a Bee question Friday about whether they were looking into whether the plane was overcrowded.

The crash occurred near the Lodi Airport, which has a skydiving center. William Dause, who operates the skydiving center at the airport, said he believes the plane flipped when it clipped a grapevine wire on approach.

“The wire caused it to flip on its back,” he said.

Dause said the pilot suffered a bloody nose.

The Cessna is owned by Flanagan Enterprises Inc., a company in Zephyr Cove, Nev., according to the aviation administration’s registry. The registry also shows that the company owns about 12 planes. Dause of the Lodi center said he rents the plane from Flanagan Enterprises.

A plane owned by Flanagan Enterprises and operated by a company called Skydive Salt Lake was involved in a crash that killed nine people in 2001 in Utah, according to National Transportation Safety Board records. The records indicate the group was returning from a skydiving trip. The plane crashed into water while descending over the Great Salt Lake near Lake Point.

A number of patrons of the Lodi skydiving center have died in recent years while skydiving. A skydiver fell to his death in February after his parachute malfunctioned. And in February 2009, two elite skydivers were killed when their parachutes tangled.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com



A skydiving plane carrying 17 people landed upside down in a vineyard near a parachuting center in San Joaquin County, but no passengers were hurt, emergency responders said.

The pilot suffered a “minor injury,” according to a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. A skydiving center official described it as a bloody nose.

The crash occurred Thursday at about 2 p.m. in a field just east of Highway 99 between Galt and Lodi. Denton Armstrong of American Medical Response, a first responder company out of Stockton, said no one was transported to hospitals.

“We made it on scene and the aircraft was upside down in a field,” he said. “It was a confirmed crash. We didn’t transport anybody. Our ambulance and fire department has left.”

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the plane was a single-engine Cessna 208. The plane experienced engine trouble right after taking off, and the pilot tried to return to the airport but may have clipped a car on approach, spokesman Ian Gregor wrote in an email.

The crash occurred near the Lodi Airport, which has a skydiving center. William Dause, who operates the skydiving center, said the plane, however, flipped over when it clipped a grapevine wire on approach. “The wires caused it to flip on its back,” he said.

Dause said the pilot suffered a bloody nose.

The Cessna plane is owned by Flanagan Enterprises Inc, a company in Zephyr Cove, Nevada, according to the aviation administration’s registry. The registry also shows that the company owns about 12 planes. Dause of the Lodi center said he rents the plane from Flanagan Enterprises.

A plane owned by Flanagan Enterprises and operated by a company called Skydive Salt Lake was involved in a crash that killed nine people in 2001 in Utah, according to National Transportation Safety Board records. The records indicate the group was returning from a skydiving trip. The plane crashed into water while descending over the Great Salt Lake near Lake Point, Utah.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sacbee.com



5:00 p.m. UPDATE: The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash that happened around 2:15 p.m. on Thursday.  The pilot had reported engine trouble in the single-engine Cessna 208 shortly after takeoff, and attempted a landing. The plane landed upside down, but not before clipping a nearby truck.

“Unbelievable. I think—it’s a brand-new truck and I was more worried about hurting the truck and didn’t think really what could have happened. Scary,” said the truck’s owner Cindy Martin.

3:30 p.m. UPDATE: The pilot has suffered minor injuries, but the rest of the passengers are OK.  The plane clipped a Toyota Tacoma during its landing. None of the 17 passengers on board were injured.

ACAMPO (CBS13) – Authorities are responding to a plane crash in San Joaquin County Thursday afternoon.

The San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office confirms the crash happened near the Skydive Lodi Parachute Center along the 4000 block of E. Jahant Road. An FAA official says a Cessna 208B with the tail number N1114A, confirmed to be a skydiving plane, was involved in the crash. The plane either made a hard landing or crashed, the official said.

Story and video: http://sacramento.cbslocal.com



Crews have responded to a skydiving plane that attempted an emergency landing in Acampo Thursday.  The landing was reported just after 2 p.m. 


The plane experienced engine trouble right after taking off, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the FAA.  The pilot tried to return to the airport in Acampo but clipped a car on approach. The plane then landed upside-down near the airport.


The plane is a Cessna 208B that had 17 passengers on board at the time of the landing, Gregor said.  None of the passengers have reported injuries, Gregor said. The pilot, however, suffered a minor injury.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.abc10.com



ACAMPO (CBS13) — A skydiving plane carrying more than a dozen people crashed near Lodi, but only the pilot of the plane that landed upside down was injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is saying just minutes after takeoff, the pilot had engine problems, turning what was supposed to be a thrilling skydiving adventure turned into a very different wild ride.

“It was loud, and like any other crash a lot of commotion,” said Kevin Conklin. “Heard the crash and looked behind me and over the top of the grapevine. Was a plane cartwheeling within 200 feet of me.”

He was at work welding when he looked up to see what was happening.

“We ran over there but the skydivers were on their feet getting each other out,” he said. “Pilot was the last one out, but he was a little bloodied, but everyone made it; pretty amazing.”

The single-engine Cessna 208 took off from Lodi Municipal Airport with 17 excited thrill seekers on board and one pilot. That pilot tried to return to the airport, but couldn’t make it. As he started to drop, the plane actually clipped the truck Cindy Martin and her husband were driving in.

“I saw a plane heading right for us. And I told my husband that planes gonna hit us,” she said. “It clipped the back end of our vehicle and then went across and flipped out in the vineyard.”

Passengers were visibly shaken, but walked off unscatherd.

Parachute center owner Bill Dause says he doesn’t know what went wrong and that his plane was well-maintained and in the sport for quite some time.

“Everyone’s fine, so I’m pleased with that, it could have been quite the tragedy,” he said. “We have no idea why it stopped running, look into quite a new airplane,a lot of upgrades on it.”


What’s even more amazing is that half of the passengers went back up in the air within 15 to 20 minutes of getting back.

Story and video:  http://sacramento.cbslocal.com








LODI — A skydiving plane had a hard landing just after takeoff early Thursday afternoon in Lodi.

The incident was first reported by the CHP shortly after 2 p.m.

The FAA confirmed to FOX40 that there were 17 people on board at the time of the hard landing. Only the pilot suffered a minor injury.

Investigators say the plane had engine trouble shortly after takeoff and tried to turn around and land again, but it clipped a car on the approach. The plane ultimately landed upside down.

Story and photo gallery:   http://fox40.com


LODI, Calif. (KCRA) —A skydiving plane hit a truck and flipped upside down during a crash landing Thursday afternoon near the Lodi airport. 

Seventeen people were in the aircraft when it crashed near Jahant Road. No injuries were reported and nobody was taken to the hospital.

Cindy Martin said the plane clipped her husband's pickup truck during the crash landing.

"I saw a plane coming down right at us. And I told my husband, 'That plane is going to hit us,'" she said. "Sure enough, it came right at us and clipped our back end enough to just really feel a good bump, and then it went out into the vineyard and flipped over."  The California Highway Patrol and the San Joaquin Sheriff's Office are investigating.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.kcra.com

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