Wednesday, May 18, 2016

North American AT-6 Texan, N3198G: Fatal accident occurred May 17, 2016 at Falcon Field Airport (KFFZ), Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

N3198G LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3198G 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA112
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 17, 2016 in Mesa, AZ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN AT 6, registration: N3198G
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 17, 2016, about 1842 mountain standard time, a North American AT-6, N3198G, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Falcon Field Airport (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Wings of Flight Foundation, and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 air tour flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from FFZ at 1841 mountain standard time.

Multiple witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff they heard "popping" sounds accompanied with a loud "bang" and it appeared that the engine was not producing enough power. As the airplane exited the airport boundary, above an airport perimeter road, it made an 180-degree turn. Immediately thereafter, the airplane impacted the ground and a postimpact fire ensued. 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Flag flies at half-staff at Mesa's Falcon Field Airport after the deadly crash.

Ataberk Besler



Amerika'nın Arizona eyaletinde 18 yaşındaki Türk genci Ataberk Besler tek motorlu uçak kazasında hayatını kaybetti.

Çanakkaleli olduğu öğrenilen Ataberk Besler, öğrenci değişim programıyla ABD'ye gitti. Salı günü ABD'nin Arizona kentinde geçirdiği uçak kazasında ise hayatını kaybetti. Besler, ailesi ve sevenlerini yasa boğdu.

18 yaşındaki Besler'in bindiği, İkinci Dünya Savaşı döneminden kalma 1945 model tek motorlu küçük uçak, salı akşamı Mesa kentinde düştü.

Kazada, AT-6 tipi uçağı kullanan 43 yaşındaki pilot Jesse R. Goodwin de yaşamını yitirdi. Uçağın kalkıştan kısa süre sonra düştüğü bildirildi.

https://www.sadecehaber.com


Jesse R. Goodwin, 43, was the pilot.

Picture by Goodwin family



The flag at Mesa's Falcon Field Airport flew at half-staff  as the community mourned and honored the pilot and young passenger who were killed when a small World War II-era plane crashed Tuesday night.

The pilot was identified Wednesday afternoon as Gilbert resident Jesse R. Goodwin, 43, an American Airlines pilot. His 18-year-old passenger was Ataberk Besler, an exchange student in the AFS-USA program from Canakkale, Turkey.

They were aboard the single-engine AT-6 when it crashed at the airport near Higley and McKellips roads.

First responders were called to the scene at about 6:30 p.m. on reports of a small plane that had crashed and burned during takeoff, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

A dust storm moved through the area Tuesday evening, but authorities said it was unclear if weather was a factor in the crash.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, Gregor said.

Goodwin was a first officer, or co-pilot, at American who also frequently flew vintage planes.

"First Officer Jesse Goodwin was part of the American Airlines family and we are saddened by this loss," Polly Tracey, an airline spokeswoman, said to The Republic. "All of us at American extend our condolences to his loved ones."

Joshua Ledlow, a director of a historical documentary titled Patriot Skies, took to Facebook on Wednesday to share his memories of recently taking photos of Goodwin flying over Canyon Lake in a Stearman Biplane, a craft used as a military trainer in the 1930s and 1940s.

"The day I took these photos I discovered more than airplanes," Ledlow wrote, describing Goodwin as "one hell of a pilot and even better person."

"These guys had the life. Blue skies and sunshine for days. My passion for film making and their passion to fly made something magical that day … a day I will never forget. Today our hearts are broken as we have lost one of our own ... my heart goes out to his family, friends and the entire aviation community at Falcon Field. We will continue to tell our story in your memory …"

Ledlow wrote that he also had flown with Daniel Cordon and pilot brothers Brian and Dale Churchill, all Mesa residents who are registered to the aircraft involved in the crash. Cordon, a member of the Wings of Flight Foundation — a group of riders based at Falcon Field — was interviewed by the FAA on Wednesday morning at the airport hangar.

Planes were taking off and landing again at the field Wednesday morning.

Corinne Nystrom, airport director at Falcon Field, said, "There's camaraderie in the love of aviation. It gets everyone through a lot."

She said the familial relationship was not unique to Falcon Field but existed among all who shared a love and passion for aviation.

Dick Stich, a retired U.S. Air Force pilot and member of the Falcon Warbirds — a group also based at the Mesa airport — said those in the close-knit Falcon Field community were shocked at the news of the crash.

"It is very, very, very, very rare for accidents involving these planes," Stich said, vouching for the AT-6 reliability. "These airplanes are maintained especially well and these accidents don't happen often."

"I'm sick to my stomach that we lost guys from the field," Stich said. "We're all friends and comrades."


Story and video:   http://www.azcentral.com



Mesa emergency crews responded to a small-plane crash near Falcon Field on Tuesday night, according to fire and medical personnel.

The crews were called to the airport near Higley and McKellips roads before 7 p.m. Tuesday.

There, first responders found two people dead in a plane crash, according to Mesa fire and medical teams.

About 6:30 p.m., a North American AT-6 Texan crashed and burned during takeoff at Falcon Field, according to Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash, Gregor said.

The incident came as a shock to those in the close-knit Falcon Field community, said Dick Stich, a retired U.S. Air Force pilot and member of the Falcon Warbirds. The group is based at the Mesa airport and memorializes pilots and veterans who have passed away by doing flyovers in the "Missing Man" formation.

“I’m sick to my stomach that we lost guys from Falcon Field,” Stich said. “Our group will offer anything we can do to help those guys out. We’re friends, comrades.”

Stich said he did not know the people who crashed on Tuesday but that they were not members of the Falcon Warbirds. However, he added that the AT-6 was a dependable aircraft.

Falcon Field was founded in 1941 as a training base for British pilots during World War II. Today, the city of Mesa owns and operates the airport, where student pilots from all over the world train. In 2011, Falcon Field celebrated its 70th anniversary as the fifth-busiest general-aviation airport in the country, logging more than 229,000 takeoffs and landings.

Story and video:  http://www.azcentral.com





MESA, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - Two people were killed when a fixed-wing airplane crashed as it was taking off from Falcon Field Airport in Mesa Tuesday evening.

Emergency crews were dispatched at about 6:45 p.m. The Mesa Fire and Medical Department confirmed the fatalities less than 30 minutes later.

The single-engine AT-6 burst into flames on impact.

Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department said the plane experienced a mechanical difficulty. The plane, which had taken off in tandem with another aircraft, crashed as the pilot was turning right.

A witness, however, told Jeff Van Sant that the plane was about to hit another aircraft. According to Martin Cervantez, it looked like the pilot lost control while maneuvering to avoid a collision, causing the plane to cartwheel.

Berry could not confirm that account, saying only that everything was "very preliminary." He said the pilot of the other plane circled and landed without incident.

Aerial video from the scene showed the demolished plane on Greenfield Road on the west side of the airport. The nose section housing the propeller broke off the body of the aircraft and was lying a few feet away. A portion of the wreckage was covered with a tarp and there was what appeared to be fire-suppression foam all over the roadway.

It's not clear if weather was a factor in the crash. Berry said the storm that swept through the Phoenix metro area had not yet moved in.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Greenfield will be closed between McDowell and McKellips throughout the night.

The AT-6 was flown during World War II and into the 1970s. The warbird, which is often used for both static displays and aerial demonstrations at airshows throughout the country, was the go-to stand-in for various Japanese planes in movies about World War II.

FAA records show the plane that crashed was manufactured in 1942 and registered to a Mesa-based LLC.

Falcon Field, which serves as a reliever to Phoenix Sky Harbor International and Phoenix-Mesa Gateway airports, is located at Greenfield and McKellips roads. The Commemorative Air Force Airbase Arizona, which offers rides aboard an SNJ/T-6 Texan, a trainer for the type of plane that crashed, is located there.

Story and video: http://www.fox10tv.com


MESA, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - Two people were killed when a fixed-wing airplane crashed as it was taking off from Falcon Field Airport in Mesa Tuesday evening.

Emergency crews were dispatched at about 6:45 p.m. The Mesa Fire and Medical Department confirmed the fatalities less than 30 minutes later.

The single-engine AT-6 burst into flames on impact.

Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department said the plane experienced a mechanical difficulty. The plane, which had taken off in tandem with another aircraft, crashed as the pilot was turning right.

A witness, however, told Jeff Van Sant that the plane was about to hit another aircraft. According to Martin Cervantez, it looked like the pilot lost control while maneuvering to avoid a collision, causing the plane to cartwheel.

Story and video:  http://www.azfamily.com





MESA, Ariz. - Two people are dead after a plane crash near Falcon Field in east Mesa. Police told 12 News the aircraft crashed on takeoff and burned. 

The bodies of two people were found among the wreckage.

The cause is under investigation. 

The plane came to rest just after 6:30 p.m. Tuesday evening in the middle of Greenfield Road between McDowell and McKellips roads.

“The nose of the aircraft is facing to the west,” said Detective Steve Berry of the Mesa Police Department. 

“For some reason that is unknown at this point, [the pilot] had difficulties -- mechanical or otherwise,” said Berry. “and kind of veered to the right before going down and crashing on the roadway.”

Mesa Police say once it hit the ground, the plane caught on fire and burned from there.

Emergency crews from the Mesa Fire and Medical station onsite responded.

“Crews make a rapid approach to the aircraft to do a quick triage and identify any savable victims,” said Captain Ken Hall of Mesa Fire and Medical. “Unfortunately in this incident, there were two victims in there that could not be saved.”

Investigators are still trying to figure out who is involved and what caused the deadly outcome.

“A tragic situation,” said Berry. “We’re right in the middle of a major roadway here in Mesa and certainly, never to minimize the tragedy, but obviously you could imagine if this had, say, hit another carload of people or bus or something of that nature. It’s an unfortunate situation for everyone involved.”

Detective Berry says so far there are no indications weather was a factor in the crash.

It was fairly windy in east Mesa late Tuesday evening, but Berry says it was pretty clear in the area when the crash happened.

Mesa Fire and police are still on scene maintaining the initial part of the investigation until the FAA and NTSB take over later Tuesday night or Wednesday.

Story and video:  http://www.12news.com

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